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Food Sites for June 2019

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Some patisserie designs from Carême, that could easily serve as wedding cakes (or, for that matter, gowns).

Last month, we opened with “Hope—as we’ve been led to believe—springs eternal,” but June might have an even better claim on that maxim, since so many people choose to get married then. 

In the spirit of full disclosure: We’ve been married for the best part of four decades, despite one’s incessant scribbling (and foisting the results on one’s long-suffering spouse). The words “patience” and “fortitude” should be inscribed over our front door—as advice to one of us, and as attributes of the other.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Some matrimonial reflections from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

The most dangerous food is wedding cake. James Thurber
In the nineteenth century, it was traditional to serve three courses of asparagus—thought to be a powerful aphrodisiac—to a French groom on the night before the wedding. The modern French gentleman has discarded the noble asparagus for the more romantic passion prompter—Champagne. Sharon Tyler Herbst
My wife and I tried to breakfast together, but we had to stop or our marriage would have been wrecked. Winston Churchill
After about 20 years of marriage, I’m finally starting to scratch the surface of what women want. And I think the answer lies somewhere between conversation and chocolate. Mel Gibson
Gary
June, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Dianne Jacob), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


— the new sites —

(Taste magazine’s Anna Hezel surveys the eight most significant food influencers of the decade)

(Taste’s Dayna Evans compares eyeballers and precisionists)

(this small museum, in Hamburg, was found—of course—by GastroObscura)

(Tony Naylor’s delightfully snarky column in The Guardian)

(Cynthia Bertelsen’s “short treatise on taste memory“)

(Robin Kaiser-Schatzlein on an attempt to do well by doing good in the food business, for The Baffler)

(Reina Gattuso, at Gastro Obscura, on the effects of human interaction with wild plants)

(Natasha Gilbert, in Nature, on recent research into tea’s stimulating properties)

(article in Science Daily, on archaeological research into the connections between chicha brewing and the political organization of Peru’s ancient Wari empire)

(Elisa Tersigni, on what we can learn from rare cookbooks on the Folger Library)

(Megan Sauter explores the ancient Jewish diet for the Biblical Archaeology Society’s newsletter)

(Cynthia Bertelsen on one of Shakespeare’s rivals... probably the only one to write a cookbook)


— inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers —







— that’s all for now —

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #224 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.


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