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Food Sites for February 2019

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Cassoulet... not pretty, but pretty good for a wintery night.

We suspect that you might be feeling a certain relief... now that the holiday season’s grande bouffe is behind us (alas, perhaps, literally—or steatopygously—behind us). Nonetheless, Roll Magazine has published some of our thoughts on holiday feasting. “Eating Our Way Through the Holidays” is served somewhat tongue-in-cheek... which means it is utterly devoid of fats and carbs.

Our next food book, Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier, is due from Rowman and Littlefield any day now. Maryann Tebben (author of Sauces: A Global History) was kind enough to write this blurb for the back cover: 

A truly comprehensive world tour of sauces, with recipes for every sauce you can imagine (and some you can’t). This book is a lively and engaging fresh take on what sauces are and how to define them, with scientific principles and a healthy dose of humor, a century after Escoffier.
We’re blushing... but we’ll take it anyway.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Some thoughts about a First World problem from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four... unless there are three other people. Orson Welles
Oh, pity the poor glutton
Whose troubles all begin
In struggling on and on to turn
What’s out into what’s in. Walter de la Mare
What feeds me destroys me. Christopher Marlowe
The optimist sees the doughnut but the pessimist see 452 calories and a shed load of sugar. James Minter
Let me have men about me that are fat... Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look. He thinks too much: such men are dangerous. William Shakespeare
Gary
February, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Jonell Galloway), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(James Edward Malin describes some of the difficulties that food scholars face in today’s libraries in an article in Graduate Association for Food Studies; it’s not about the absence of snacking opportunities)

(Mayukh Sen’s article, in Topic, on foods meant to soothe the souls of the bereaved)

(archive of articles from Gastro Obscura)

(Gael Greene, on becoming Gael Greene under the tyranny of New York’s haute cuisine, in her blog, Bite: My Journal)

(Marissa Nicosia on several versions of this medieval/winter favorite)

(Carys Bennett, Jan Zalasiewicz, Mark Williams, and Richard Thomas on chicken “evolution” for The Conversation)

(Robert Simonson debunks some fakelore for Punch)

(Ernie Smith writes, for Tedium, about the meat industry’s attempts to find more profitable ways to cut meat—making inexpensive parts of each animal more desirable)

(archived New York Times article, from February 4, 1895, on the city’s first meatless eatery)

(Matt and Ted Lee, at Garden&Gun, mourn the loss of some traditional southern foodstuffs)

(Mayukh Sen’s essay, in the Poetry Foundation magazine, on the cookbooks of Maya Angelou)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----








---- yet another blog ----



---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #220 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.


Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.

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