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Food Sites for December 2016

Sunday, November 20, 2016

French Red Shallots, Allium cepa var. aggregatum

The holiday season of excess is crouched outside the door, and soon we’ll be begging not to even think about another rich dish. But, until then, the cool weather makes firing up the oven, or having something simmering on the back burner all day, seem magically domestic.

Roll Magazine published “Thanksgiving,”  a somewhat cantankerous look at the holiday—one that brazenly refuses to include even a single recipe. 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quote (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) leans upon some thoughts about the staff of life.

Proust had his madeleines; I am devastated by the scent of yeast bread rising. Bert Greene  
The toaster is part of a system and only has significance relative to the wrapped, pan-made, thin-crusted bread that can be used in it … Ultimately, the toaster is an apology for the quality of our bread... the toaster represents a heroic attempt to redeem our packaged bread... Every piece of toast is a tragedy. Arthur Berge 
A three-year-old gave this reaction to her Christmas dinner: “I don’t like the turkey, but I like the bread he ate.” Author Unknown
Gary
December, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Dianne Jacob), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don‘t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.

PPS: Want to give On the Table a holiday gift, without spending a dime of your own money on it? See the bottom of this newsletter!

---- the new sites ----

(Courtney Humphries, at Cook’s Science, on the role of bitterness in beer—and foods—and recent attempts to moderate it with mycological extracts)

(something sweet from Lauren Rothman, at Serious Eats)

(the online companion to Cook’s Illustrated)

(Mexico Cooks!’s own Cristina Potters)

(The New York Times’ Mimi Sheraton ponders a ponderous question)

(Erin Ross, at NPR’s The Salt, on how archaeologists are using evidence from fossil teeth to discover what our ancient ancestors ate)

(Jancis Robinson on the debunking of “minerality” in wine descriptions)

(Sarah Laskow, at Atlas Obscura, on the history, and fortunes, of America’s founding fish, shad)

(José R. Ralat, at Cowboys & Indians, on the history, mythology, and culture of a misunderstood traditional regional specialty)

(assembling a collection of agricultural photos at The Farmer’s Museum, in Cooperstown, NY)

(a guide to sake, by Tasting Table’s Lizzie Munro)

(Matthew Braga, at Atlas Obscura, on recent attempts to re-create the staple foods of sea-farers of the past)

(Kristy Mucci, at Saveur, on persimmons that won’t pucker you)

(Adam Kinkaid, on a museum dedicated to Poland’s rogale świętomarcińskie, a pastry that is nothing like the familiar French crescent)

(Eater’s Daniela Galarza soft-serves the regional names for a lot of frozen treats)

(Evan Edwards, at 3 Quarks Daily, on the poet’s conflicted feelings about carnivory)


---- an inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----



---- still another blog ----



---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to give On the Table a holiday gift, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to do your holiday shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #194 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.


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