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Food Sites for September 2016

Wednesday, August 17, 2016
Beautiful Swimmers (Callinectes sapidus), crusted with Old Bay.

This may be the September issue, but it’s still August while we’re typing—and it’s bloody hot. It’s been bloody hot for ages. That means we long to wade into spicy salty foods (like steamed crabs) and hose ourselves down with icy IPA. Okay... maybe concentrate on getting most of that beer inside us (‘though a sanitizing beard shampoo wouldn’t be a terrible idea after a crabby encounter).

ANYWAY... there’s always someone who tells us that the reason spicy foods are preferred in hot climates is because it makes the natives perspire, which then cools them. Maybe that would work in the desert—where humidity doesn’t exist—but we’ve never noticed a sweat-shortage problem anywhere else. Eliminating excess moisture is more like it. 

We suspect that the cooling idea has as about much validity as the old saw about spices being used to cover the taste of spoiled meat. We scarf down spicy dishes for the same reason we swig frosty brews: We just like ‘em.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quote (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) is meant to encourage us to write more (and well) about food—‘though a couple of blog posts in the “inspirational” section, below, warn us to watch our language.

Do not be afraid to talk about food. Food which is worth eating is worth discussing. And there is the occult power of words which somehow will develop its qualities. Marcel Boulestin

Gary
September, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Karla Simon), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(recipes, ingredients, restaurants, from incredibly varied regional cuisines—including Afro-American and Afro-Caribbean foods)

(an Eater interview with Andrew Zimmern that addresses all things gastronomic—and anatomical)

(the story of “the Chile Capital of the World,” in New Mexico Magazine)

(Harold McGee begins one of his fascinating conversations at Lucky Peach)

(David Chang uses logic in an unexpected way to understand the intersection between flavor and memory)

(it’s not all about Jack)

(thousands of downloadable hi-res fruit images)

(Dwight Furrow, in Edible Arts, on how knowledge can inform perception in wine tasting)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----






---- still more blogs ----







---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Some of the URLs we provide may occasionally link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation (other than the fact that they looked interesting to us).

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
These newsletters merely update the contents of this book; 
what doesn’t appear here is already in the book.

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)


Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #191 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.


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