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Food Sites for July 2016

Wednesday, June 15, 2016


Great Spangled Frittillary (Speyeria cybele) on Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa). It must be summer!

Since our last issue, we’ve been hiking and photographing (not to mention eating) our way across New York’s Adirondacks and Finger Lakes regions—and yet, we’ve found time to put together a summer issue of these updates.

In other news: Roll Magazine has posted “St. Even’s Challenge,” a culinary adventure story. Modern Salt has published another gastronomic saga: “Fat Lady Burrito,” one with a moral of sorts (or at least what passes for a moral around here). 

Inscrutably, our latest book’s (Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods) release date has been changed to July fifteenth. Perhaps the powers that be are waiting for the book to complete its fermentation (either that, or US Customs noticed a strange smell coming from the shipment of books from England). We have received our authors copies, so we know they exist...

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

“Sumer is icummin in” and this month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) can “sing cuccu” with the best of em:

The nectarine and curious peach Into my hands themselves do reach; Stumbling on melons, as I pass, Ensnared with flowers, I fall on grass. Andrew Marvell 
Around here, grillin’s grillin’ and barbecue is, well—sigh, sweat’what dinin’ in heaven's got to be all about. Jane Garvey 
When one has tasted watermelon he knows what the angels eat. Mark Twain
Gary
July, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Fabio Parasecoli), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.

---- the new sites ----

(Zev Robinson’s exhibit of paintings, food, film, and wine at the London Cooking Project)

(Dean Burnett, in The Guardian, on why the various parts of our bodies can’t seem to agree)

(Paula Mourenza, at Culinary Backstreets, on the ritual, historical, and botanical aspects of Ilex paraguariensis)

(John Metcalfe, in The Atlantic, on a banquet of foods with a message, served in Gembloux, Belgium)

(how Western plant foods became Chinese mainstays; a contribution from The Cleaver Quarterly’s to Lucky Peach)

(Chris Ying’s “global look at the tube steak”—via Lucky Peach)

(Andrea Nguyen dishes on the quintessential Vietnamese rice-noodle soup, at Lucky Peach)

(Nigerian chef Tunde Wey, thinking about race and assumptions in the food industry and elsewhere; article in the Boston Globe)

(Jonathan Morris’s paper addressing the “...material history of espresso that can be read alongside that of the socio-cultural conditions that have occasioned its success”)

(Stanley Dry stirs the pot at Southern Foodways Alliance)

(Chris Fuhrmeister, at Eater, waves a red flag in front of a lot of Texas longhorns)

(Ria Misra, at Gizmodo, on new research from the famous Monell Chemical Senses Center)

(Erin McCarthy seeks an answer at Mental Floss)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----






---- still more blogs ----







---- thats all for now ----


Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Some of the URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation (other than the fact that they looked interesting to us).

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to the cost of whatever you purchase there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
[these newsletters merely update the contents of this book; 
what doesn’t appear here is already in the book]

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
 (Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #189 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.


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