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Food Sites forJuly 2019

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

“What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child?” Lin Yutang

This issue marks the beginning of our twentieth year of publishing these updates. Time flies when... who are we kidding? Time just flies.

The Rambling Epicure has published our article, “The History of Roquefort French Dressing,” just in time for salad season.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Some patriotic reflections for the Fourth of July, from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

A man accustomed to American food and American domestic cookery would not starve to death suddenly in Europe, but I think he would gradually waste away, and eventually die. Mark Twain
After a few months acquaintance with European coffee ones mind weakens, and his faith with it, and he begins to wonder if the rich beverage of home, with its clotted layer of yellow cream on top of it, is not a mere dream after all, and a thing which never existed.  Mark Twain
Gary
July, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Cynthia Bertelsen), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


— the new sites —

(Chris Shott’s praise for Frank Meyer, discoverer of a famous lemon; at Taste)

(five cookbooks, from the 1940s and 50s, in the University of Wisconsin-Madison Library’s digital collection)

(Peter Whoriskey and Rachel Siegel, in The Washington Post, on how conditions have not improved in the cocoa industry)

(Canadian database; Part II—“Settler Colonialism and Recipes in the Early Modern Maritimes” here)

(Laura Shapiro, in The Atlantic, on how we became a society of insatiable snackers)

(a useful tool from Gode Cookery)

(Bernice Chan explains in The South China Morning Post; spoiler alert: it was a political decision, in the 1930s)

(Amanda Mull on the history of American breakfast choices, in The Atlantic)

(Josh Jones looks at Twain’s nostalgic longing for the foods of home, for Open Culture)

(Kirsten Weir on neurogastronomy, for the American Psychological Association’s Monitor on Psychology)

(Clay Risen, in The New York Times, on brewing up some medieval sorcery in Minnesota)

(Caitlin Kearney’s article from The Smithsonian)

(O brave new world that has such meats in it; Meg Wilcox explains at Civil Eats)

(Caitlin Kearney’s article from The Smithsonian)

(Emma Grahn and Caitlin Kearney explore another decade for The Smithsonian)

(India Mandelkern, at Munchies, on a process that doesn’t at all resemble the drama of a TV restaurant make-over)

(recent archaeological work at West Cotton in Northamptonshire; posted at medievalists.net)

(Joshua Specht, author of Red Meat Republic, on the historical intersection of class and gender at the butcher’s counter)


— inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers —








— changed URL —



— that’s all for now —

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #225 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for June 2019

Wednesday, May 8, 2019

Some patisserie designs from Carême, that could easily serve as wedding cakes (or, for that matter, gowns).

Last month, we opened with “Hope—as we’ve been led to believe—springs eternal,” but June might have an even better claim on that maxim, since so many people choose to get married then. 

In the spirit of full disclosure: We’ve been married for the best part of four decades, despite one’s incessant scribbling (and foisting the results on one’s long-suffering spouse). The words “patience” and “fortitude” should be inscribed over our front door—as advice to one of us, and as attributes of the other.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Some matrimonial reflections from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

The most dangerous food is wedding cake. James Thurber
In the nineteenth century, it was traditional to serve three courses of asparagus—thought to be a powerful aphrodisiac—to a French groom on the night before the wedding. The modern French gentleman has discarded the noble asparagus for the more romantic passion prompter—Champagne. Sharon Tyler Herbst
My wife and I tried to breakfast together, but we had to stop or our marriage would have been wrecked. Winston Churchill
After about 20 years of marriage, I’m finally starting to scratch the surface of what women want. And I think the answer lies somewhere between conversation and chocolate. Mel Gibson
Gary
June, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Dianne Jacob), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


— the new sites —

(Taste magazine’s Anna Hezel surveys the eight most significant food influencers of the decade)

(Taste’s Dayna Evans compares eyeballers and precisionists)

(this small museum, in Hamburg, was found—of course—by GastroObscura)

(Tony Naylor’s delightfully snarky column in The Guardian)

(Cynthia Bertelsen’s “short treatise on taste memory“)

(Robin Kaiser-Schatzlein on an attempt to do well by doing good in the food business, for The Baffler)

(Reina Gattuso, at Gastro Obscura, on the effects of human interaction with wild plants)

(Natasha Gilbert, in Nature, on recent research into tea’s stimulating properties)

(article in Science Daily, on archaeological research into the connections between chicha brewing and the political organization of Peru’s ancient Wari empire)

(Elisa Tersigni, on what we can learn from rare cookbooks on the Folger Library)

(Megan Sauter explores the ancient Jewish diet for the Biblical Archaeology Society’s newsletter)

(Cynthia Bertelsen on one of Shakespeare’s rivals... probably the only one to write a cookbook)


— inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers —







— that’s all for now —

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #224 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for May 2019

Saturday, April 13, 2019

Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in spawning colors

Hope—as we’ve been led to believe—springs eternal, but the converse is also true: Spring hopes eternal. Every day brings dreams of elusive vernal fare: eager trout, and cooperative morels, and ramps nodding in soft breezes. If only hope was sufficient to serve them up! 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Some springy daydreams from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

In the vegetable world, there is nothing so innocent, so confiding in its expression, as the small green face of the freshly-shelled spring pea. William Wallace Irwin
Some fishes become extinct, but Herrings go on forever. Herrings spawn at all times and places and nothing will induce them to change their ways. They have no fish control. Herrings congregate in schools, where they learn nothing at all. They move in vast numbers in May and October. Herrings subsist upon Copepods and Copepods subsist upon Diatoms and Diatoms just float around and reproduce. Young Herrings or Sperling or Whitebait are rather cute. They have serrated abdomens. The skull of the Common or Coney Island Herring is triangular, but he would be just the same anyway. (The nervous system of the Herring is fairly simple. When the Herring runs into something the stimulus is flashed to the forebrain, with or without results.) Will Cuppy
What could be got from the woods was free and amounted to a diurnal dining diary that everyone kept in their heads. May was wild asparagus, arugula, and artichokes. Bill Buford
Gary
May, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to David M Rosenstein), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Reina Gattuso shows us, at GastroObscura, that ethnic cleansing is sometimes served in the cafeteria)

(over twenty articles on Chinese food from the University of Oregon)

(Marissa Nicosia, gelling in the Folger Library’s Shakespeare & Beyond)

(Elaine Castillo, at Taste, on one foreign influence on the food of The Philippines)

(Allison Aubrey, for NPR’s The Salt, on why some people are not eating their vegetables)

(Jennifer McGavin, at the Spruce Eats)

(Bethany Econopouly and Dr. Stephen Jones wrestle with legal and conceptual definitions for The Bread Lab)

(Rohini Chaki, at GastroObscura, on the prototypical example of cultural appropriation of the culinary variety)

(Irene Yoo, at Food52, on the role of Japanese occupation on a basic staple of the Korean diet)

(text of John Kirkland’s 1911 book; in The University of Leeds Library)

(Mike Pomerantz writes, in Food & Wine, on work done by Gordon Shepherd, author of Neuroenology: How the Brain Creates the Taste of Wine)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----












---- yet more blogs ----




---- changed URL ----



---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #223 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for April 2019

Saturday, March 16, 2019


Winter has only four days left as we write. Traces of Spring are beginning to appear, but it’s still cold enough for long slow-cooked meals. A pot of beans would do nicely—even if they’re dried (unlike the fresh cranberry beans above... the produce of a previous summer).

Winter is made for scribblers like us, if only because there are no soft breezes, hazy vistas, shy morels, or rising trout to distract us. We’re doing our best to make use of the time, adding chapters to one novel while editing another. Someday, we might even find a new subject for a food book...

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Some mixed opinions about the musical fruit from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

Abstain from beans. There be sundry interpretations of this symbol. But Plutarch and Cicero think beans to be forbidden of Pythagoras, because they be windy and do engender impure humours and for that cause provoke bodily lust. Richard Taverner
If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts. Martial
I have no truck with lettuce, cabbage, and similar chlorophyll. Any dietitian will tell you that a running foot of apple strudel contains four times the vitamins of a bushel of beans. S.J. Perelman
Better beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear. Aesop
Gary
April, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Elatia Harris), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Megan Gannon reviews some recent Mycenaean archeology for Live Science)

(Devorah Emmet Wigoder, on “herbs and spices of the ancient Near East” for Bible History Daily)

(Patricia Gadsby and Eric Weeks, in Discover Magazine, on the influence of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis on the flavor of San Francisco’s famous bread)

(Edith Zimmerman, in New York magazine, on experiencing capsaicin)

(archaeologists’ efforts to understand the dining habits of students and faculty in nineteenth century Michigan)

(Bruce Bower, at Science News, looks at what recent DNA research can tell us about the 9,000-year domestication of maize’s wild ancestor, teosinte)

(podcasts of the BBC Radio4 series)

(Wee Ling Soh’s article, in Roads & Kingdoms, on an archetypical fusion cuisine)

(Siddhartha Mukherjee, in The New York Times, on the dearth of knowledge about the intersection of nutrition and oncology)

(Matt Davis’s article, at Big Think, on the economics, ecology, and aesthetics of synthetic meat)

(Chip Walton interviews Jenny Linford—author of Missing Ingredient—for The Splendid Table)

(Melissa Kravitz discusses the linguistic and legal issues for Truthout)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----








---- yet another blog ----



---- changed URL ----



---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #222 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.


The Libro-Emporium

Doorstops and lavatory entertainments abound in our book store.