Subscribe

Through the wonders of modern telegraphy, you may now receive updates from this site in your electro-mailbox. Simply enter your email address below:


Or subscribe via RSS.

Archives

food sites for November 2014

Monday, October 13, 2014

A bushel of winter squash at a farm stand, Palenville, New York


November is the start of our annual marathon of holiday over-eating or, as we like to call it, “La Grande Bouffe.” With any luck -- sometime in early January -- we’ll shove back from the groaning table (and even more groaning chair) in better condition than the leading characters of that French–Italian exercise in excess.

However, we’ve learned, from long -- and often humiliating -- experience, not to make any rash promises.

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served,  directly -- but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. Also, our stuff frequently appears in Roll Magazine, and last month’s article was on Beechnuts -- which, against all expectations, does not once mention chewing gum.

You can also, should you desire to, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter -- and even a cursory glance at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner will reveal links to entirely too much of our online logorrhea. 

Pre-empting the gorging season, On the Table’s culinary quote collection waxes fat about fat:

American consumers have no problem with carcinogens, but they will not purchase any product, including floor wax, that has fat in it. Dave Barry 
I have a great diet. Youre allowed to eat anything you want, but you must eat it with naked fat people. Ed Bluestone 
America is now the fattest country in the world and getting fatter every day. unnamed H.J. Heinz Co. executive 
Its OK to be fat. So youre fat. Just be fat and shut up about it. Roseanne Arnold
Gary
November, 2014


PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs -- or know of wonderful sites weve missed (as does Elatia Harris, who is always finding great sites) -- please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites -- thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or -- if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues -- you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. There are links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

Austerity Kitchen, The
(Christine Baumgarthubers food history columns; archive of older postings here)

Chef Stories
(a collection of six profiles -- Grant Achatz, Mario Batali, Anthony Bourdain, David Chang, Julia Child, and Alice Waters -- in The New Yorker)

Cooking
(thousands of recipes from The New York Times)

Early Chinese Food History
(Jacqueline M. Newman’s article in Flavor & Fortune)

Food Snobbery Explained
(some embarrassing self-revelation from Snobsite.com)

Frugal Housewife, The: Or Complete Woman Cook
(scanned facsimile pages, and PDF version, of Susannah Carter’s 1803 book)

fruitsinfo.com
(tropical, exotic, accessory, and hybrid fruits; plus fruit news and recipes)

Gareth Jones Food
(website of a self-described gastronome – and food consultant, cook, traveler and educator)

GMOs are Old Hat. Synthetically Modified Food is the New Frontier
(Eliza Barclay reports of new technologies that produce artificial foodstuffs by fermentation, rather than by less appealing, or environmentally-less desirable, methods – such as from petrochemicals)

Gourmet
(selections from the magazine’s archives: 1940s-1970s & 2000s)

Great Hog-Eating Confederacy, The
(Christine Baumgarthuber on the place of pork and corn in the historical diet of America’s southerners)

History on the Half-Shell: The Story of New York City and its Oysters
(article by the New York Public Library’s Carmen Nigro)

Honey, Food is All About Power
(dialogue, between Bani Amor and Thy Tran, on false assumptions about “ethnic” food writers, the imagined audience for their writing, and the ways food writing is used to reinforce stereotypes about race and ethnicity for profit)

How to Prepare a Sauce for the Lords and How Long it Lasts
(recreating a sour twelfth-century recipe that features sweet spices)

In Search of Taste
(quarterly magazine “…dedicated to examining gastronomic cultural traditions [of] the symbiotic affinity between simple food and wine…”)

Information is Beautiful
(infographic on compatibility of flavors)

Joanne Chang Brings the Sweet Science of Sugar to Harvard
(Eater National account of her lecture/demonstration)

Mad Feed
(food for thought via articles and TED-like video presentations)

Magical Tour of Yotam Ottolenghis Cookbook Collection, A
(an interview with the author of Plenty)

Morsel
(another aggregator of food articles)

Museum of Food and Drink, The (MOFAD) 
(New York City’s future museum, “… about the culture, history, science, production, and commerce of food and drink,” where one will be able to smell and taste the exhibits)

Myth of Togetherness Around the Table, The
(apparently -- in England at least -- it didn’t exist before middle-class Edwardians decided it should)

See It, Want It: Window Food Displays
(Jan Whitaker, on restaurants’ use of their windows to attract customers)

Seven Moles of Oaxaca, The
(from Mexican chef par excellence, Zarela Martinez)

Tea if by Sea
(Dan Jurafsky’s history of tea, with an emphasis on linguistics)

Wine Snobbery Explained
(“Wine snob. Isn’t that a redundancy…?” more embarrassing details from Snobsite.com)

Zythum: An Egyptian Precursor to Beer
(food safety microbiologist Peter Olsen blogs about an ancient brew)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----

Book academy

Getting Started with Social Media

So You Want to Be a Food Writer

Writer, The


---- yet more blogs ----

Botanist in the Kitchen, The

Draughts Are Deep, The

Edible Arts

Edible Legacies

Fork Tales

Language of Food, The

Morsel

Odd Pantry, The

Plate, The

Ruth Reichl

Shepherd and the Olive Tree, The

Taste of History with Joyce White, A



---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose -- ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers 
(Paper), (Kindle

The Herbalist in the Kitchen 

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries 

Human Cuisine 

Herbs: A Global History 

Terms of Vegery 

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating 

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #169 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication -- unless with the author'‘s prior written permission -- is strictly prohibited.

Copyright, 2014 by Gary Allen.





Food Sites for October 2014

Sunday, September 14, 2014



Ain’t no frost on these punkins yet, but it’s just a little ways off. Some are destined for jacks o’lanterns, some to be smashed in the street, but around here they’ll find their way into pie shells, bread pans, and – a personal favorite – ravioli (with brown butter, crisp-fried sage leaves, toasted pecans, and crumbled gorgonzola). Winter’s coming, we shouldn’t be overly concerned about calories, right?

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served,  directly -- but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically.

If you are so inclined, you can follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Not all of the blather we post there is about food, but there’s usually enough to provoke literary dyspepsia. Knock back some omeprazole before visiting the links to all of our online scribbles posted at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

We’re all supposed to consume things that are in season, hence these excerpts from On the Table’s culinary quote collection (no guarantees that they’re locally grown):

My favorite word is “pumpkin.” You can’t take it seriously. But you can't ignore it, either. It takes ahold of your head and that’s it. You are a pumpkin. Or you are not. I am. Harrison Salisbury
What calls back the past like the rich pumpkin pie? John Greenleaf Whittier
Vegetables are a must on a diet. I suggest carrot cake, zucchini bread, and pumpkin pie. Jim Davis (Garfield)
Gary
October, 2014

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs -- or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed (as does Cara DeSilva, who is always finding great sites) -- please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites -- thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or -- if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues -- you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(article about Nawal Nasrallah’s translation of Ibn Sayyar al-Warraq’s Kitab al-tabikh)

(the simple, elegant – and commonly- accepted – theory doesn’t stand up to scrutiny)

(Yunfei Zheng, Gary W. Crawford, and Xugao Chen, on development of peach varieties, ten thousand years ago; in PLoS ONE)

(Jaime Jurado’s article in The BREWER International)

(an archive of Janet Fletcher’s columns in The San Francisco Chronicle)

(a large archive of posts by Cynthia D. Bertelsen)

(reproductions of vintage menu art, signage, and ephemera, and guide to other collections)

(“Updating Early Modern Recipes (1600-1800) in a Modern Kitchen”)

(Paula Wolfert’s article in the Los Angeles Times)

(“A peer-reviewed e-journal published by McGill Library,” in English and French)

(“But…” Rachel Laudan asks in the Los Angeles Times, “…what would an ‘authentic’ cookbook really look like?”)

(these culinary terms are neither quite German nor quite Russian, which makes sense since they’re from “two German colonies located near the Volga river”)

(a group of scholars working to improving free online access to historical archives of recipes)

(online food magazine from CNN)

(“Worcester’s American Antiquarian Society puts historic recipes [hand-written pages] online”)

(something like an annotated index of interesting food writing, with samples and links to complete texts)

(article about food photographer Tonelli, in Digital Camera Magazine)

(video reviews of international cookbooks)

(not Ray Charles’ Georgia, but the spice section alone will keep this Georgia on my mind)

(Rachel Laudan on what to do and what not to do, the whys and hows, and supporting resources)

(illustrated explanation of ingredients; from Saveur)

(2.6 million copyright-free illustrations, from 500 years of publishing)

(sociologists Sarah Bowen, Sinikka Elliott, and Joslyn Brenton on why a healthy home-cooked meal is not always an option)

(Maxim Edwards on Armenian coffee traditions, heavily-infused with history and politics)

(Nicholas Gill’s article, about Renzo Garibaldi, that will have you thinking a lot about aged meats)

(searchable directory of holdings in the USDA’s National Agricultural Library)

(e-zine about regional foods of the world)

(Kevin Cox, on pastas made from wheat, rice, and other starches – such as beans, sweet potatoes, and yams)

(Niki Achitoff-Gray on the science, properties, and preparation of many grains, even those that are not grasses – such as amaranth, buckwheat, and quinoa)

(recipes that pair well with wine)

(Andrea Stone tells, in National Geographic, why “ancient grains and ‘orphan crops’ like fonio and amaranth have advantages for farmers and consumers”)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----



---- yet more blogs ----








---- changed URLs ----

Culinary Historians of Canada
(formerly Culinary Historians of Ontario)




---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose -- ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs:

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers 

The Herbalist in the Kitchen 

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries 

Human Cuisine 

Herbs: A Global History 

Terms of Vegery 

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating 

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

“The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #168” is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication -- unless with the author’s prior written permission -- is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2014 by Gary Allen.





food sites for September 2014

Friday, August 22, 2014


“A Colonel of Corn,” from Terms of Vegery



With September, harvest kicks into high gear, the nights grow cooler, and we begin to feel more like cooking and -- as the old timers said -- “putting food by.” This summer has been frantic, busier (and stranger) than any in our memory. Frankly, we’ll be happy to return to a slower life, with slower food, and maybe a few more calories than we’ve allowed ourselves. As Leslie Newman said, As the days grow short, some faces grow long. But not mine. Every autumn, when the wind turns cold and darkness comes early, I am suddenly happy. It's time to start making soup again. 

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served, directly -- but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically.

While you’re waiting for the happy little popping sounds that indicate that your home-canned foods might not actually give you a mid-winter case of botulism, you can follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more links to our online scribbles are posted at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Not corn, this time -- but another member of the Poaceae tribe -- in this month’s excerpts from On the Table’s culinary quote collection:

Rice is a beautiful food. It is beautiful when it grows, precision rows of sparkling green stalks shooting up to reach the hot summer sun. It is beautiful when harvested, autumn gold sheaves piled on diked, patchwork paddies. It is beautiful when, once threshed, it enters granary bins like a (flood) of tiny seed-pearls. It is beautiful when cooked by a practiced hand, pure white and sweetly fragrant. Shizuo Tsuji
Rice is born in water and must die in wine. Italian Proverb 
Eating rice cakes is like chewing on a foam coffee cup, only less filling. Dave Barry 

Gary
September, 2014



PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs -- or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed -- please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites -- thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or -- if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues -- you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

(four journalists “dig up the roots of American food”)

(database of archived materials, worldwide – a search, using keyword “food,” found over 29 thousand archives)

(article by Jaime Jurado)

(“…website for all things associated with the Historic [Tudor] Cookery Team at Hampton Court Palace”)

(Adam Gopnik on the nature of food writing, in The New Yorker)

(NPR story about a course being offered at Washington DC’s American University)

(a taste of luxury from the time of George II)

(article by Eric LeMay, in Alimentum)

(an aggregator of interesting food articles from around the world)

(spoiler alert: the pots are older than agriculture)

(Michael Ruhlman’s blog post on the subject)

(article does not specify if a dry rub was used, nor what style of sauce was served)

(“Feminist Food & Culture Quarterly… that aims to disrupt the canon of mainstream food and cooking magazines”)

(article by Tamasin Day-Lewis in Saveur)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----








---- yet another blog ----

Cooking the Books (not the same as the forum above)


---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose -- ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs:

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it needn’t even be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers (Paper) (Kindle)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen (Hardcover) (Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries (Hardcover) (Kindle)

Human Cuisine (Paper) (Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History (Hardcover) (Kindle)

Terms of Vegery (Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating (Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

“The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #167” is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication -- unless with the author’s prior written permission -- is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2014 by Gary Allen.





The Libro-Emporium

Doorstops and lavatory entertainments abound in our book store.