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Food Sites for June 2016

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale).
Every Spring, they arrive—like herring—by the millions, ready to be served: raw as salad, cooked as potherbs, or brewed into a coffee substitute or old-fashioned wine.
While some people struggle to maintain uniform green lawns, we don’t care a bit. We welcome the dandelions  appearance each year.

June is, as the song says, “bustin’ out all over.” It’s as apt a description as one could want. We’re nearly overwhelmed by the proliferation of lush greenery and flowers, a cacophony of birdsong and buzzing insects, trout leaping in the brooks, and new fawns frolicking in their polka-dotted finery.

In other news: Modern Salt has posted “Enlightened Carnivory,”  a newly revised version of something from one of our Kindle books (How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice & the Nature of Eating). Drexel University’s magazine, Taste Matters, includes “The Colors of Cheese.” Finally, at last, our latest book (Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods) will be released on June 15th!

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served,  directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) celebrates foods, like dandelions, that are free for the taking:

My fare is really sumptuous this evening; buffaloe’s humps, tongues and marrowbones, fine trout parched meal pepper and salt, and a good appetite; the last is not considered the least of the luxuries. Journals of Lewis and Clark, Thursday, June 13, 1805 
A white truffle, which elsewhere might sell for hundreds of dollars, seemed easier to come by than something fresh and green. What could be got from the woods was free and amounted to a diurnal dining diary that everyone kept in their heads. May was wild asparagus, arugula, and artichokes. June was wild lettuce and stinging nettles. July was cherries and wild strawberries. August was forest berries. September was porcini. Bill Buford 
The kind of crabbing my wife likes to do is to return from an afternoon’s swim or sunbathing session, open the refrigerator door, and find a generous plate of crab cakes all ready to cook. Euell Gibbons
Gary
June, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Cynthia Bertelsen), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don‘t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.

---- the new sites ----

(alas, despite so many of Shakespeare’s phrases becoming essential parts of modern English usage, “hide the salami” was not among them)

(Catherine Lamb baked four creepy-crawly tollhouse cookie recipes for Lucky Peach readers—so we don’t have to)

(Stephen Schmidt, of Manuscript Cookbooks Survey [see below], has a good look at upscale dinner-party planning of the mid-nineteenth century)

(Jessica Firger’s article in Newsweek)

(online monthly newsletter of the Culinary Historians of Canada)

(well-abstracted podcasts, from Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley, on food science and history)

(descriptions of 37 types, by The Cleaver Quarterly and Lucky Peach)

(Nils Bernstein’s quick survey, at Food Republic)

(Blake Lingle’s Lucky Peach article on the history and technology behind frites/chips/fries)

(on accessing recipe manuscripts, digitally, at the American Antiquarian Society)

(Ashlie Stevens joins in the discussion, at The Guardian)

(Sean Timberlake explains all at About.com)

(Stephen Forbes on the historical and sociological reasons behind the changing status of certain fruits and vegetables)

(article, in The Economist, examining recent research on the effect of early food processing on human evolution)

(searchable database assembled by Europeana.eu and the Digital Public Library of America in conjunction with the Medicine and Society chair at University of Fribourg; a search for “food”—68,620 hits, “cooking”— 19,110, but “dessert” garnered just 757)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----





---- yet another blog ----



---- that‘s all for now ----



Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Some of the URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these Food Sites newsletters merely update the contents of this book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods (pre-order)
(Hardcover)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #188 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.


On Turning Seventy

Sunday, May 1, 2016

Turning seventy is treated as some kind of accomplishment, even a notable achievement. Perhaps it is, of sorts—but only in a negative sense. It means that, for a very long time, mismanagement of my affairs and fairly continuous application of bad judgment have failed to put a stop to whatever it is I do on this planet.

I’m generally uncomfortable when receiving compliments, as they carry the burden of reciprocation. This is awkward, since—in general—neither I nor the other person are deserving of any particular praise. I’m especially uneasy when I know for a fact that the encomia are unearned. Acknowledgment of intelligence is as unsettling (aside from being utterly mistaken) as being noted for height or eye color. Not one of these qualities is the result of any effort on anyone’s part.

Being feted for accumulating seven decades of existence is much the same. So, now that the big day is upon me, I feel only the urge to hide.

What, after all, have I accomplished? A largish number of days have passed, without the slightest bit of help from me. Roughly twice as many as Mozart or Jesus accrued, who—by any reasonable measure—accomplished somewhat more than have I.

An overabundance of days should not, in itself, be cause for celebration. All those days represent is a number of complete circuits around a rather ordinary star, a star notable only for its nearness to a relatively insignificant planet. The total number of those solar circumabulations—purely by an accident of evolution—seem noteworthy to us because we imagine they have some numerical significance. However, that significance is utterly arbitrary. No number, by itself, means anything—and the fact that one is an even multiple of ten (a number that gives the impression of being meaningful only because we have ten fingers, making it easier for counting than some other number) is an anthropocentric illusion.

If turning seventy signifies anything at all, it is that it’s occasionally possible for one to acquire a degree of perspective (perspective that would have been more beneficial—and saved everyone from a lot of embarrassment—if developed much earlier).

Food Sites for May 2016

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Atlantic Herring (Clupea harengus harengus).
Every Spring, they arrive—by the millions, from the ocean, ascending the Hudson River, then up tiny feeder streams like Black Creek in West Park, NY—to spawn.

May is the “sweet of the year,” as mentioned in Taste Matters, below. It’s far too perfect to stay indoors, but if a rainy day happens to prevent you from picnicking—or just sitting outside with a glass of something cool and decadent—there’re a lot of goodies to be sampled in this issue.

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served, directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. For example: Modern Salt has posted “Dream Dish,” a tale of adolescent food lust. Roll Magazine has also published “How to Decide?” — an essay that could be considered a form of fudging, except that it has nothing to do with fudge. Also, Drexel University’s magazine, Taste Matters, includes some Spring-like speculations called “Knocking Trout off its Perch.” 

Oh yes... one more thing. Our latest book (Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods) comes out on May Fifteenth!

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) acknowledges my impending achievement of a life-long goal—surviving three score and ten—and having an excuse to steal from my literary idol’s comments when he did the same:

The seventieth birthday! It is the time of life when you arrive at a new and awful dignity; when you may throw aside the decent reserves which have oppressed you for a generation, and stand unafraid and unabashed upon your seven-terraced summit and look down and teach—unrebuked. You can tell the world how you got there. It is what they all do. I have been anxious to explain my own system this long time, and now at last I have the right. Mark Twain 
I have achieved my seventy years in the usual way: by sticking strictly to a scheme of life which would kill anybody else. It sounds like an exaggeration, but that is really the common rule for attaining old age. When we examine the program of any of these garrulous old people we always find that the habits which have preserved them would have decayed us. I will offer here, as a sound maxim this: that we can't reach old age by another man’s road. Mark Twain 
In the matter of diet—which is another main thing—I have been persistently strict in sticking to the things which didn't agree with me until one or the other got the best of it... Mark Twain
Gary
May, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we‘ve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Dianne Jacob), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.

---- the new sites ----

(well-illustrated online exhibition from the American Antiquarian Society)

(Xianfeng Luo, “Seeking authentic Chinese cuisine in seven regions;” in Drexel’s Table Matters)

(Christine Baumgarthuber’s account, at The New Inquiry, of the history of food writing, from a class perspective)

(Sharon Hudgins on those classic German molded cookies; originally published in Gastronomica)

(Fabio Parasecoli, at Huffington Post, on some of the complex issues raised by the popularization of an “ethnic” cuisine on another continent)

(Thomas A. P. Van Leeuwen on the history of Alexis Soyer’s magic portable stove and other inventions; in Cabinet Magazine)

(searchable database of menus in the Los Angeles Public Library’s Rare Book Room in the Central Library)

(Andrea Small Carmona, in Scientific American, on how—and when—two peanut ancestors managed to form the hybrid we can’t stop eating)

(Jane Black, in The Washington Post, on “America’s own cucina povera”)

(Jan Whitaker on restaurants, from the 20s & 30s, that look like anything but restaurants)

(Kenny Sokan’s report on PRI—Public Radio International)

(BBQ brings out strong opinions, and Judson Carroll’s, at Reclaiming Southern Food, is as adamant as any)

(a digitized “collection of 16th-19th century domestic recipe manuscripts,” at London’s Wellcome Library)

(Sharon Lathan explains what it was like in “the kitchen areas of a Regency house”)

(Nicola Miller’s elegant explication of aroma and memory, with just the right amount of salt)

(Edible Brooklyn‘s Sarah McColl on some aspects of food in art: sexual, political, and social; more about food in art at the Whitney Museum and The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

(Deborah L. Krohn, of the Getty Research Institute, on the illustrations in l’Opera di M. Bartolomeo Scappi)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----
















---- more blogs ----





---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Some of the URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advange of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation (other than the fact that they looked interesting to us).

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these Food Sites newsletters merely update the contents of this book; what doesn't appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods (pre-order)
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ISBN/1780235720/onthetable08-20     )

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #187 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for April 2016

Thursday, March 17, 2016


Mustard greens (Brassica juncea)
Before the days of long-distance groceries, they 
provided something fresh after a winter of root vegetables

April may—or may not—be the cruelest month, but our April issue is especially large this year. If that seems cruel, sobeit.

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served, directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. Modern Salt has posted “Give Me Insurrection or Give Me Indigestion”  and another piece (or two) will be coming along soon. 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) is a heavy-handed attempt to acknowledge the opening of a new season of baseball in the form of a culinary coda:

I devoured hot-dogs in Baltimore ‘way back in 1886, and they were then very far from newfangled...They contained precisely the same rubber, indigestible pseudo-sausages that millions of Americans now eat, and they leaked the same flabby, puerile mustard. Their single point of difference lay in the fact that their covers were honest German Wecke made of wheat-flour baked to crispiness, and not the soggy rolls prevailing today, of ground acorns, plaster-of-Paris, flecks of bath-sponge, and atmospheric air all compact. H.L. Mencken
Americans can eat garbage, provided you sprinkle it liberally with ketchup, mustard, chili sauce, Tabasco sauce, cayenne pepper, or any other condiment which destroys the original flavor of the dish. Henry Miller
Dibbler could find a use for bits of an animal that the animal didn’t know it had got. Dibbler had worked out that with enough fried onions and mustard people would eat anything. Terry Pratchett
 Gary
April, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Janet Clarkson), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.

---- the new sites ----

(Kevin Carter, of Savoring the Past, on using Google Books to access rare culinary texts)

(Dwight Furrow, at Edible Arts, on caffeinated reverse snobbery)

(Edward Behr’s introduction to cheese, in The Art of Eating)

(Jaya Saxena, at First We Feast, wonders why Westerners have such a hard time understanding the “fifth taste”)

(Jan Whitaker on Sylvester Graham’s ideal meals—which, apparently, did not include graham cracker piecrusts)

(Amy Bentley, Bee Wilson, and Annie Gray discuss the way we teach our children to eat; a little less than an hour at Gastropod)

(Julia Belluz, at Vox, on Marion Nestle’s work to reveal the connection between food industry’s marketing and some questionable research)

(an NPR story about, in a way, smart food)

(Cynthia Bertelsen explains things for puzzled Yankees)

(Altin Raxhimi on the diasporic history and etymology of a classic Balkan cheese)

(“500 years of bread, yeast and wheat history in 200 pictures,” with a bit of introductory text)

(Anastacia Marx de Salcedo tours a supermarket for evidence)

(a guide from Wired magazine)

(thirteen turbulent years covered in a virtual exhibit by The Kentucky Digital Library and the Digital Public Library of America)

(The Washington Post’s Roberto A. Ferdman reports on recent research showing that the consumption of chocolate improves one’s cognitive ability)

(“...with Thanks to the English;” history and recipes from Cynthia Bertelsen)

(Mackensie Griffin’s report, at NPR’s The Salt, rethinking our nostalgia for the good old days)

(Nicola Miller’s rhapsody to an under-appreciated fruit)

(Lisa Hix, at Collectors Weekly, provides an in-depth look at Toni Tipton-Martin’s The Jemima Code: Two Centuries of African American Cookbooks)

(Niki Achitoff-Gray gets serious about Italian preserved meats, at Serious Eats)

(two articles by Dwight Furrow)

(Kathleen Purvis rightfully complains, at Bitter Southerner, about gender imbalance in a particular genre of foodwriting)

(Noah Charney, at Lucky Peach, explains how and why we like being fooled by food)

(to bay or not to bay... a number of different responses)

(looking at Chinese-American Restaurants, 1896-1926, through their menus)

(Christine Jones, at The Public Domain Review, on the early history of chocolate in Europe)

(Margot Henderson, at Lucky Peach, discussing the differences between male and female chefs)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----







---- more blogs ----




---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Some of the URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, theyll cost you money to take full advange of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation (other than the fact that they looked interesting to us).

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
This Food Sites newsletter merely updates the contents of this book; 
what doesnt appear here is already in the book.

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods (pre-order)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #186 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for March 2016

Monday, February 15, 2016


Hama Hama oysters, from Washington’s Hood Canal, just one of the good reasons to invite ice indoors.
(This is still one of the months with an R in it—even if that old rule no longer applies—and oysters are always welcome around here.)

The last full month of winter is about to end (and not a minute too soon if you ask us). With March, we hope to see signs of Spring’s approach—which is not always a sure thing, no matter what the calendar says. Meanwhile, boeuf bourguignon and such-like slow-cooked dishes provide a good excuse to avoid going out in the cold.

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served,  directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. February has been rather hectic around here, plus I’m starting work on another book, so no new stories have been posted...  but Modern Salt will put up two—that haven’t been seen in a long time—in March. The first will appear on March second, and the other a few weeks later. You’ve been warned. 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) indulge, literarily, our love for Crassostrea gigas

If you dont love life you cant enjoy an oyster; there is a shock of freshness to it and intimations of the ages of man, some piercing intuition of the sea and all its weeds and breezes. Eleanor Clark 
I asked the waiter for a dozen Portugaises and a half-carafe of the dry white wine they had there ... As I ate the oysters with their strong taste of the sea and their faint metallic taste that the cold white wine washed away, leaving only the sea taste and the succulent texture, and as I drank their cold liquid from each shell and washed it down with the crisp taste of the wine, I ... began to be happy and to make plans. Ernest Hemingway 
I am ready to defend the right of the tasty crab, the luscious oyster, the noble rockfish and the incomparable terrapin to continue their part in the penitential practice of Friday. Lawrence Cardinal Shehan, Archbishop of Baltimore 
You are eating the sea, thats it, only the sensation of a gulp of seawater has been wafted out of it by some sorcery, and are on the verge of remembering you don’t know what, mermaids or the sudden smell of kelp on the ebb tide or a poem you read once, something connected with the flavor of life itself. Eleanor Clark (on oysters) 
It is proved by experience that, beyond five or six dozen, oysters certainly cease to be enjoyable. Grimod de la Reyniere 
Oyster: A slimy, gobby shellfish which civilization gives men the hardihood to eat without removing its entrails. The shells are something given to the poor. Ambrose Bierce
Gary
March, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Jim Chevallier), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Jonell Galloway on the various ways the French preserve, and intensify, the flavors of foods)

(Michael Beschloss, in The New York Times, on the first president’s second career)

(Ruth Reichl waxes nostalgic while reading an unusual community cookbook)

(the old ways may not fare well against modern agriculture, but they often lead to much tastier food)

(Les Leftovers serves up part 1 of  “the lost cheeses of Medieval France;” part 2, “What, no Camembert?” )

(Michael Ruhlman on why “American food shoppers are confused”)

(detailed overview, replete with recipes and bibliography)

(Hint: it has something to do with pandan)

(the article doesn’t actually answer the question, but provides links to recipes that produce that crunchy layer)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----




---- more blogs ----





---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
Our Food Sites newsletters merely update the contents of this book; what doesn't appear here is already in the book.

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods (pre-order)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

"The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #185" is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.




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