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Food Sites for April 2017

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis

April Fool’s Day: A fly fisher’s religious holiday, celebrated by tricking oneself into thinking that this year it will be different. It won’t snow, icy water won’t overflow one’s hip boots, one won’t be surrounded by worm fishermen who haul in fish after fish while one silently prays that one’s fingers won’t be too frozen to respond in the unlikely event that a trout actually takes a fly. 

Opening Day is the reason Irish Coffee was invented.

Last month, Roll Magazine ran our article about searching for morels. “Spring: An Old Man’s Fancy Turns to Thoughtsof Mushrooms” is almost the opposite of a how-to article.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quotecollection) are even more fishy than usual.

My fare is really sumptuous this evening; buffaloes humps, tongues and marrowbones, fine trout parched meal pepper and salt, and a good appetite; the last is not considered the least of the luxuries. Journals of Lewis and Clark, Thursday, June 13, 1805 
Give a man a fish; you have fed him for today. Teach a man to fish; and you can sell him fishing equipment. Anonymous

 Gary
April, 2017

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out juicy sites (like Cynthia Bertelsen), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Fabio Parasecoli, at Huffington Post, on a recent book about the role of race in the White House kitchen)

(Daniela Blei, in Kitchn, on the shady history of the delicacy in America)

(Amanda Yee, at Paste, on a nearly forgotten item of travel food; see also “Unpacking the Chicken Box: The Story Behind Baltimore’s Carryout Staple”)

(guide to some of the special collections in the library of the University of Guelph)

(Frank Bruni’s New York Times op ed, “We’re brutal on eating habits, period.”)

(Randy K Schwartz examines the intersection of philosophy and gastronomy, in Repast)

(Esther Mobley, in the San Francisco Chronicle, on what happens as wines age, and how—and why—we react to the changes)

(Ed Yong, in The Atlantic: Fred Flintstone was a locavore)

(Lolis Eric Elie, in Oxford American, on the little-recognized influence on Creole cooking by black cooks)

(Arielle Milkman, at Eater, on how a Black Panther project led to the creation of a federal program)

(Simon Cotton, in The Conversation US, gives us something to chew about Glycyrrhiza glabra)

(Nicola Miller covers everything except Monty Python’s take on the subject)

(Eboni Harris, at Highsnobiety, on the denial of black contributions to a classic regional cuisine)

(Jeremy Glass, at Extra Crispy, listens to these foods, and decided that “eating crunchy food produces an orchestra in our brain that’s playing, like, every one of your favorite songs at the same time”)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----



---- still more blogs ----






---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs:

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle
)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #198 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2017 by Gary Allen.



Food Sites for March 2017

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

The grave of Julius Caesar, in Rome’s Forum

The Ides of March are almost upon us... and being frivolously food-obsessed, we naturally think of Caesar Salad (which, of course, has nothing whatsoever to do with the very late emperor). We’ve visited the subject before, so no need to exhume it now.  As some unknown wag has so aptly put it, “Rome wasn’t burned in a day.” 

It’s a phrase we find oddly comforting in these perilous times.

Last month, on Just Served, we ranted a bit about a couple of products that have been sacrificed to someone else’s notions of progress. The essay is called “Products Perdu.”

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

It should be obvious, by now, that weve come to purée Caesar, not to braise him... and, since we started this issue with a soupçon of political innuendo, we might as well conclude this month’s quote (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) by dishing out more of the same.

To make a good salad is to be a brilliant diplomatist—the problem is entirely the same in both cases. To know how much oil one must mix with one’s vinegar. Oscar Wilde  
You can’t make a good speech on iced water. Winston Churchill 
Alcohol is a very necessary article. It enables Parliament to do things at eleven at night that no sane person would do at eleven in the morning. George Bernard Shaw

 Gary
March, 2017

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out juicy sites (like Cynthia Bertelsen), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Awanthi Vardaraj, at Paste Quarterly, on “the glorious varieties of Indian desserts” non-Indians have probably never tasted)

(an exhibit, by the USDA, about the Bureau of Home Economics begun in the 1930s)

(Nicola Miller serves them up, hot and fresh, at Paste)

(Sharon Butler, at Smithsonian Journeys Quarterly, notes that artists—starving or not—have been fascinated by food since the Stone Age)

(recipes and culture of the region)

(as Paul Rudnick wrote in the The New York Times, “…sugar tastes really, really good”)

(as Adam Teeter explains at Vinepair, it’s both complicated and not so much)

(Jan Whitaker on one of America’s most famous eaters)

(Michelle Allison, in The Atlantic, says we choose our diets based on our fear of death)

(another Lucky Peach guide, this one excerpted from Seductions of Rice, by Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid)

(Rachel Lauden on the tasks involved to provide and prepare Irish staple before the famine)

(Dwight Furrow, at Edible Arts, tells us that we can only taste what we expect to taste; the article is about wine, but is applicable to other tastes)

(Victoria Pope, at Smithsonian Journeys Quarterly, answers the question: “War… what is it good for?”)

(The Back Label’s Camille Berry decants the improbable secret behind luscious dessert wines, like Chateau d’Yquem)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----



---- still another blog ----



---- changed URL ----



---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs:

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle
)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #197 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2017 by Gary Allen.



Products Perdu

Saturday, February 11, 2017
Most of the preserved foods discussed in my book, Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Food, are quirky, often intensely-flavored foods and condiments produced by salting, drying, and especially fermenting. They’re foods that define moments in our collective past, or recreate the taste of exotic places. We treasure them because they are not like the bland mass-productions of the latest technologies.
All too easily, our favorite flavours can disappear, doomed to exist only as regret-filled nostalgia. Here are two accounts of such products we may never taste again.
Leiderkrantz was an early example of what we might call an “artisanal cheese” today. Soft-ripened and aromatic, with a firm crust, it was nothing like modern mass-produced processed cheeses. It was invented in response to a contest sponsored by a New York City delicatessen owner—Adolphe Tode—who wanted to replace imported Bismarck Schlosskâse with a lower-priced domestic imitation. It was named for a German singing society in New York, and its popularity grew quickly.
Eventually, its tiny dairy barn factory was replaced by larger quarters. At first the cheese could not be made at the modern plant. Legend has it that the original boards from the old plant were nailed up inside the sterile facility, and as much of the cheese as could be found on store shelves was smeared on the boards to recreate the proper biological environment for the cheese. Whatever actually occurred, they were able to restart the cultures and this wonderful cheese was saved.
For a while.
Borden’s bought the rights to the cheese, adding their logo to the little boxes. However, the stinky cheese market was too small for the corporate giant. They discontinued production in the early 1980s—ironically, just as Americans were beginning to develop a taste for something more sophisticated than bland industrially-produced “cheesefood.”
Borden’s sold the rights, and the all-essential cultures, to a firm in Australia. Rumours circulate, every few years, that production of Leiderkrantz will begin again, but those of us who hold fond memories of this wonderfully smelly cheese have been disappointed every time.

Somewhat closer to home, an iconic New York State product has also been lost—again to the requirements of an industry that is more concerned with the demands of a mass market than with the unique and defining properties of that signature product.
Back in the 1970s and early 80s, I became fond of Saratoga Vichy Water. It was naturally carbonated, had a distinctive mineral taste, and just a suggestion of sulphur in its bouquet. It amused me to think that I was getting a foretaste of how I was likely to spend eternity—albeit in a somewhat more refreshing form. I also liked the look of the old-fashioned bottle. It suggested continuity with our region’s past, and the ocher, red and black label, with a logo of interlocked letters, suited perfectly its green glass bottle.

Sometime later in the 1980s, I was served a bottle of Saratoga water in a restaurant. It came in a modern blue glass bottle, with no suggestion of its former appearance, other than the words “Since 1872.” The word “Vichy” was nowhere to be seen. I assumed that the packaging merely reflected the usual rebranding that companies are wont to do. 
I was disabused of that notion with the first sip.
No mineral taste. No suggestion of demonic possession. Just the innocuous taste of ordinary tap water, with bubbles. It tasted like generic store-bought seltzer, not even the time-honoured stuff I used to have delivered—by the wooden case, in antique siphons—from Gimme Seltzer. when I lived on the Upper West Side. I was disappointed and confused. Why would they do such a thing?
Of course, we know why. 
To make more money.  
The company needed to expand to secure a larger market than culinary throwbacks, like me, could provide. Their marketing people, no doubt, said something along the lines of, “Nobody really likes this smelly stuff anymore. People want something that seems clean and fresh. Let’s filter the hell out of it and put it in blue glass, because that’ll make them think it’s cool and pure.” 
Naturally, there was another profit-making aspect to the switch. According to Adam C. Madkour, the CEO of Saratoga Spring Water Company, the new version has very low levels of dissolved minerals like calcium, iron, and sodium—the very things that gave the old version its distinctive taste.  Apparently, those minerals reduced the shelf life of the Saratoga Vichy, which “made it unsuitable for bottling. He added, The way we think as consumers today is very different than the way we used to. Too much sodium is not good for you.”
So, once again, progress has eliminated a bit of our past. It’s a reflection of the same sort of mentality that believes beautiful old buildings can, indeed should, be torn down so that modern—and intentionally short-lived—replacements can go up in their stead. 
As with Leiderkrantz, the old product was abandoned just before American consumers developed a passion for terroir (and aversion to ennui-inducing blandness). Today, at least in Los Angeles, a water sommelier is serving and informing his clientele about the virtues of, and differences between, dozens of expensive waters from around the world. It may sound pretentious, here, but Europe has had water sommeliers for some time. There’s some hope that such refinement may take root beyond LA.
On another front, since its springs are what once made Saratoga a famous destination, the city has maintained twenty-one of them available to the public. Many of them are in Saratoga Spa State Park, but some are right in town. Each one has a different mineral profile, and therefore has a unique taste. I’ll never get one of those lovely old bottles again, but I can still taste a bit of history—for free.

Food Sites for February 2017

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Sucrose

On this cold and gray day, it’s pleasant to reflect on the fact that Spring—the sweet of the year—will eventually come (no matter what the prognosticator of Punxatawney, PA has to say about it). So we’ve chaptalized this month’s must—to make it go down easier—or dull the senses with more alcohol—whichever is needed.

Speaking of which, last month Modern Salt published “A Wine Epiphany on the Cheap,” proving—for some us at least—that it is possible to overthink a glass of wine.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quote (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) attempts to add a little sweetness to this bitter season.

Honey comes out of the air … At early dawn the leaves of trees are found bedewed with honey. … Whether this is the perspiration of the sky or a sort of saliva of the stars, or the moisture of the air purging itself, nevertheless it brings with it the great pleasure of its heavenly nature. It is always of the best quality when it is stored in the best flowers. Pliny 
A pessimist is someone who looks at the land of milk and honey and sees only calories and cholesterol. Anonymous 
“Bee vomit,” my brother said once, “thats all honey is,” so that I could not put my tongue to its jellied flame without tasting regurgitated blossoms. Rita Dove 
Gary
February, 2017

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out juicy sites (like Jill Norman), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we‘ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Modern Salt’s Jill Norman remembers the great cookbook author)

(Lucky Peach’s Scarlett Lindeman reveals that there’s a lot more to Mexican sauces than mole poblano and guacamole)

(NPR’s Nicole Jankowski on the life and career of Carême)

(quick NPR interview with zooarchaeologist Naomi Sykes)

(Gary Taubes makes the case in The Guardian)

(philosopher Dwight Furrow, in Edible Arts, takes on the issue of context in the appreciation of wine)

(Emrys Westacott, at 3Quarks Daily, says it’s a mixed bag; “just because something seems right or feels right does not mean that objectively speaking it is right”)

(James Hamblin, in The Atlantic, “...it’s strange to be militantly inflexible about rules that are barely more than arbitrary”)

(“Food tells us a lot about what it means to be human, which is to be neither a be[a]st merely feeding nor some kind of pure mind or soul that does not need to eat.” In Symposion Journal)

(Max Falkowitz, in Saveur, on an “ingredient that rules the world”)

(John Raven’s articles about Texas’ most famous foods—from chicken-fried steak to sonofabitch stew)

(Jill Norman, at Modern Salt, on Piper nigrum)

(Saveur’s Alex Testere on the miracle of Scottish heather honey)

(food for thought from Claudia McNeilly, in Canada’s National Post)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----





---- still more blogs ----








---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #196 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2017 by Gary Allen.



food sites for January 2017

Sunday, December 18, 2016

Sage, à la neige

As we write this, the holiday season of excess is no longer crouched outside the door, it’s taken up residence. In the interest of public service, and to help us all stay on our diets, this issue contains zero calories and saturated fat. However, should you choose to act on any of the tasty things described (we’re looking at you, pecan pie), all bets are off. 

Of course, there are always New Year’s resolutions to make up for these minor infractions, right?

Speaking of infractions, last month Roll Magazine published “My Dinner with Zal,” an alliterative remembrance of a memorable past repast. 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter.  Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quote (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) shows how thoughtful a host or hostess can be.

Even today, well-brought-up English girls are taught by their mothers to boil all veggies for at least a month and a half, just in case one of the dinner guests turns up without his teeth. Calvin Trillin

Gary
January, 2017

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out juicy sites (like Rachel Laudan), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Nick Hines, at Vinepair, on the travels of the high-powered Scandinavian herbal liqueur)

(Zach Brooks, at Lucky Peach, explains how to tell kalguksu from dongchimi guksu)

(Dana Hatic, at Eater, on a southern tradition that’s become an American standard)

(Fabio Parasecoli on film and food porn; a more scholarly take, focusing on intersections between haute cuisine, the media, and awareness—and defining—of class can be found at: Starred Cosmopolitanism: Celebrity Chefs, Documentaries, and the Circulation of Global Desire)

(Michael Snyder, at Lucky Peach, describes 25 different—and nicely illustrated—breads)

(“…a professional organization for culinary professionals, agriculture professionals, and scientists of gastronomy in the context of brain and behavior”)

(website of the author of many award-winning cookbooks about a remarkable cuisine)

(Becky Libourel Diamond on a classic dessert that didn’t always include chocolate)

(Katie O’Reilly’s interview, in Sierra, with Mike Krebill—author of The Scout’s Guide to Wild Edibles: Learn How to Forage, Prepare & Eat 40 Wild Foods)

(Chi Luu, at JSTOR Daily, on the way certain parts of speech can refer, simultaneously, to several different sensations)

(Michael Wolf, at Forbes, on an emerging technology that might force us to rethink the eating phenomenon)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----










---- still more blogs ----





---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #195 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2017 by Gary Allen.


The Libro-Emporium

Doorstops and lavatory entertainments abound in our book store.