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Food Sites for June 2015

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Hama Hama oysters, on the shore of Washington’s Hood Canal


We’ve been traveling, for the past three weeks or so, and have eaten well—and not-so-well—across some twenty states. Unfortunately, while driving along the Interstates, we find nothing but fast-food chains. Never-ending variations on the theme of fried flesh and starch. We search in vain for something raw or even fresh—and must often abandon all hope of finding any decent vegetables. However, by exiting the endless divided highway for back roads, some toothsome surprises may be encountered.

We suspect that there’s a metaphor here about food writing, but we’ll leave its discovery to you, gentle reader.

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served, directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. For example, “A Study in Contrasts,” a recent exercise in self-indulgence, addresses some mixed feelings that one might experience when guided by one’s stomach. 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes from On the Table’s culinary quote collection are all from another American traveler:

A man accustomed to American food and American domestic cookery would not starve to death suddenly in Europe, but I think he would gradually waste away, and eventually die. Mark Twain 
After a few months’ acquaintance with European ‘coffee’ one’s mind weakens, and his faith with it, and he begins to wonder if the rich beverage of home, with its clotted layer of yellow cream on top of it, is not a mere dream after all, and a thing which never existed. Mark Twain
 Sacred cows make the best hamburger. Mark Twain
Gary
June, 2015

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites—thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. There’re You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

20 Delicious Bug Recipes from Chefs
(Mandy Oaklander on the latest in creepy-crawly cuisine; in Time magazine)

Bro and a Philosopher Debate the True Meaning of a Sandwich, A
(it’s not a simple question to answer…)

Culinary Historians of Piedmont North Carolina
(meetings held at Flyleaf Books, 752 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., Chapel Hill, NC)

Fruits and Vegetables Are Trying to Kill You
(Moises Velasquez-Manoff on recent research into the relationship between plant stressors and human health)

How to Read a Wine
(Dwight Furrow: “…when you taste a wine you taste the residue of geography and culture”)

Human Cheese
(experimenting with bacteria from our bodies to produce cheeses)

Let’s Eat Together: How Immigration Made British Food Great
(the gastronomic melting pot is not a solely American phenomenon)

On Food Labels, Calorie Miscounts
(Philip J. Hilts on a more scientific method for counting calories, in The New York Times)

Real North Carolina Barbecue
(“barbecue” is always a contentious subject, so don’t expect this article to mince words)

Science Giveth and Science Taketh Away
(Dwight Furrow on glass shape and the perception of wine)

Science: The Missing Ingredient in the So-Called Art of Cooking
(Cynthia Bertelsen’s plea for, and links to sources of, scientific literacy for cooks—and, by extension, food writers)

Shared Meals
(Jan Whitaker, on some of the less-than-savory things restaurants used to serve)

UC Food Observer
(food and agriculture news from University of California)

When Eating Dairy Was a Life-or-Death Question
(Susan Cosier on archaeological evidence for early cheese-making and the evolution of milk-tolerance in adults)

Why Comfort Food Comforts
(Cari Romm’s psychological insights, in The Atlantic)

Why (Western) Philosophers are Late to the Dinner Party
(philosopher Dwight Furrow considers the reasons other philosophers have so rarely considered food to be a worthy topic)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----

5 Ways to Get Publicity for Your Book (That Aren’t Related to Your Book Launch or Book Tour)

How to Start a Food Blog: 10 Tips from a Veteran Blogger

How to Start a Food Blog: A Step by Step Dummy Proof Guide

Kidnapped!* A Case of Plagiarism


---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 



Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper) (Kindle)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper) (Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #176 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





A Study in Contrasts

Thursday, April 30, 2015
Last weekend, we were in NYC—and, being little more than peripatetic gullets, we wanted to experience some of the unique dining opportunities Gastropolis had to offer. Such visits always remind me of ravening wolves descending upon a village.
On Saturday night, we went to Eataly, the rightfully ballyhooed emporium of Italian gourmandise. Even before opening the door, it was obvious that every cubic inch of that palace of the palate was filled with people—an awe-stricken gawk-jawed Eatalian swarm. There was certainly much to inspire their awe: shelf after never-ending shelf of exquisite comestibles; display cases filled with meats, fish, cheeses, pastries, and breads—of a fineness never to be seen in suburban supermarkets; ample opportunities to sample the output of several kitchens (assuming—admittedly a rather large assumption—that one could find an empty seat to occupy); books; cleanly-designed cookware; perfect fruits and vegetables; rare olive oils and ancient vinegars; pasta in shapes and sizes to dazzle the imagination; plus souvenirs to prove that one has made it to the promised land. The bounty—displayed in spanking new splendor, seemed never-ending. At table, the food and service were faultless. That itself was a managerial miracle, considering the frantic ambiance of the place—an odd amalgamation of first day of vacation season at Disneyworld, the seventh game of a subway World Series, and the tossing of the first Christian to the lions at the Coliseum.
The next morning, we schlepped down to Houston Street, for a late breakfast at a New York landmark. For those who’ve never been to Yonah Schimmel, the place is tiny (twenty people would probably over-crowd the place… and would barely leave room for a few of their colossal knishes). I suspect they’ve never changed their recipes for egg creams, knishes, half-sours, and coleslaw—even slightly— in over a century. In place of the polished faux rusticity of Eataly, Yonah Schimmel sports fifty-year old formica, a thick coat of red enamel that tried (and failed) to rejuvenate the even older battered chair-rails, and several generations’ of faded celebrity photos and autographs, valentines from notable noshers of the past.

Restaurants like Yonah Schimmel are fast-disappearing, victims of rising rents, changing demographics, real estate prices, and fickle tastes. They’re being replaced by high-rise condos and the mega-glitz of places like Eataly. Don’t get me wrong—I thoroughly enjoyed eating at both places. However, while I felt restored (not to mention stuffed) on Houston Street, Eataly’s unabashed excess left me with a kind of metaphorical emptiness, a slight tristesse of embarrassment. Perhaps that was not a bad thing; after too much self-indulgence, a little class-conscious guilt can be just the right digestif.

Food Sites for May 2015

Friday, April 17, 2015

The Hudson Valley’s first violets of the year.


‘tis May, almost, and we’re about to go on a big road-trip—one of our favorite things. There will be a lot of eating, audio books, eating, gawking at scenery, eating, taking thousands of photos, and possibly some more eating. Because we wont have much internet access,  Junes issue will likely be late and probably a little scrawny. You may, however, count yourself lucky if you are not among the few unfortunates who will be subjected to the traditional post-vacation soporific slide show.

My latest addition to Reaktion Books’ Edible series, Sausage: A Global History, (all about our favorite mystery meat) is complete, edited, indexed, and in their spring catalog. It will be released in September—along with Brian Yarvin’s Lamb: A Global History (between us, we’ll cover much of the succulent entrée category). Our next book, on preserved foods, has passed through its second edit and is current lounging on a desk somewhere in Greater London (it’s publication is a year or so away—so you'll have plenty of time to digest all that sausage and lamb).

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served,  directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter.  Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes from On the Table’s culinary quote collection are—like road-trips themselves—a mixed bag, a traveler’s pot-luck:

“When you come to a fork in the road, it’s time to eat.” Bob DelGrosso 
“I don’t think the road to heaven is paved with bean curd.” David Shaw 
 “He that travels in theory has no inconveniences; he has shade and sunshine at his disposal, and wherever he alights finds tables of plenty and looks of gaiety. These ideas are indulged till the day of departure arrives, the chaise is called, and the progress of happiness begins. A few miles teach him the fallacies of imagination. The road is dusty, the air is sultry, the horses are sluggish. He longs for the time of dinner that he may eat and rest. The inn is crowded, his orders are neglected, and nothing remains but that he devour in haste what the cook has spoiled, and drive on in quest of better entertainment. He finds at night a more commodious house, but the best is always worse than he expected.” Samuel Johnson 
“Las Vegas is Everyman’s cut-rate Babylon. Not far away there is, or was, a roadside lunch counter and over it a sign proclaiming in three words that a Roman emperor’s orgy is now a democratic institution... ‘Topless Pizza Lunch.’” Alistair Cooke

Gary
May, 2015

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites—thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and frankly amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

eatfeed
(“Food porn for the intellectual cook;” podcasts for people like us… who care, perhaps too much, about food)

Food Babe Blogger Is Full of Shit, The
(a real scientist, Yvette dEntremont, looks at the kind of pseudoscience that often appears in food blogs)

Food: The Newest Celebrity
(Megan Garber, in The Atlantic, on the kind of porn whose “…subjects are often actual pieces of meat…”)

How Snobbery Helped Take the Spice Out of European Cooking
(reflecting on flavor and history, from NPR)

Inside Louis’ Lunch, the 120-Year-Old Birthplace of the Hamburger
(Erin DeJesus on the historic New Haven eatery)

Interlibrary Snacking
(some food history from The New York Academy of Medicine)

Introduction of Chili Peppers to India, The
(Laura Kelley, the Silk Road Gourmet, traces their earliest appearance in written recipes)

Marlena Spieler
(a food writer & broadcaster’s site)

My Obsession: The Laurel Family
(Deborah Madison on the Lauraceae, with special attention to bay leaves and avocados)

Smoke: Why We Love It, for Cooking and Eating
(Jim Shahin waxes rhapsodic—and a little scientific—in The Washington Post)

Stupid Wine Journalism
(food and wine journalists beware—Dwight Furrow is paying attention)

Thai Food Glossary
(just a small part of Clay Irving’s huge recipe site)

Trash Food
(Chris Offutt on class, suspicion, guilt—in part revealed by what’s on our plates)

Why the Beef? Empire and Cuisine
(an essay by Rachel Laudan)

Writing Food History
(an outlined overview of the various directions the field can take, by Peter Scholliers)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----

How to Shine Blogging for a Single Reader!


---- yet another blog ----

Brian Yarvin


---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper) (Kindle)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper) (Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
PRE-ORDER

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #175 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





Food Sites for April 2015

Saturday, March 21, 2015
Is this news or crass hucksterism? Your call.


Despite what one poet had to say about the cruelness of April, this one promises to be especially kind around here. First, of course is that our wicked witch of a winter will be “really most sincerely dead.” Where’s the cruelty in that, Mr. Eliot?

This April, moreover, has even more good news for us. We were interviewed for an HBO special, Thought Crimes, which will premiere at the Tribeca Film festival this month. OUP is about to release The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets, which includes our lengthy article, “Insects.” OK, the news, so far is kinda’ creepy (and occasionally crawly)—but there is some tastier news.

My latest addition to Reaktion Books’ Edible series, Sausage: A Global History, (all about our favorite mystery meat) is complete, edited, indexed, and on its way to press. It is already listed online and will be included in Reaktion’s spring catalog (and at stand 6A109 of the London Book Fair, April 14-16).

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served,  directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the CornerWhile this newsletter is mostly about food, food history, food science, food writing—let’s face it, it’s about filling our faces and thinking about the process, before, during, and after the fact.

This month’s quotes from On the Table’s culinary quote collection are entirely self-serving. Well, mostly self-serving...

A highbrow is the kind of person who looks at a sausage and thinks of Picasso. Alan Patrick Herbert 
What? Sunday morning in an English family and no sausages? God bless my soul, what’s the world coming to? Dorothy Sayers 
Doctor, do you think it could have been the sausage? last words of Paul Claudel

Gary
April, 2015


PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites—thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. There’re You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

Basic Fare: Club Sandwiches
(Jan Whitaker dishes on the popular double-decker standby)
at NYC’s New School)

Celebrating a Hawaian Lu’au
(Jeanelle Kam and Rachel Laudan serve a detailed description of the preparation of this traditional feast)

Early Vegetarian Restaurants
(Jan Whitaker on some pre-hippie—that is, doomed—attempts at meatlessness)

Food & Food Preparation: Bread, Biscuit, Waffles & Wafers
(a slide show of eighteenth-century baking images and items)

Food and Back Migration: The Cornish Pasty Plot Thickens
(Rachel Laudan knocks the stuffing out another food fallacy)

FRENCH BREAD HISTORY: Gallo-Roman Bread
(more from bread historian Jim Chevallier)

History and Ritual of Brunch, The: with Farha Ternikar
(a video lecture, sponsored by Culinary Historians of New York and the Food Studies Program)

How the Apothecary Gave Birth to the Modern Cocktail Movement
(Warren Bobrow takes a cordial look at mixology in his Eater article)

How the Tudors Invented Breakfast
(Ian Mortimer in BBC History Magazine)

In Praise of the Chapaterati
(Claire Chambers on London’s curry houses)

Listening, Tasting, Reading, Touching: Interdisciplinary Histories of American Food
(four scholars take on the “inherent interdisciplinarity of food history;” at the American Historical Association’s annual meeting)

Taste-Based Medicine
(India Mandelkern looks at the connection between gastronomic and medical practices in various cultures)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----

Branding as a Writer, Rebranding as a Foodwriter


---- yet more blogs ----

Code of Eatics, A

Insatiable



---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)

Human Cuisine
(Paper

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #174 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





Foodsites for March 2015

Saturday, February 21, 2015



March is pretty much devoid of holidays, unless you count the First Day of Spring (which is usually a let-down for folks who have endured months of the kind of weather we’re seeing right now). We long for balmy days, sauntering through budding forests, stooping to pluck the occasional ramp or morel, or watching a dry fly drifting toward an especially cooperative brookie, while wildflowers nod on mossy banks, and soft breezes carry melodious birdsong. 

March provides none of that. 

What we do have is a window view of a snow-topped bird-feeder (surrounded by juncos, cardinals, downy woodpeckers, chickadees, and sparrows—so many greedy bickering sparrows), a warm house, soon to be filled with smell of slow-cooked foods suitable for the season, and the chance to forestall the onerous shoveling of snow by producing this newsletter.

Regular subscribers to this newsletter receive them from our blog, Just Served, directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner

This month’s quotation is not from On the Table’s culinary quote collection but, we feel, is more along the lines of venting:

Winter is icummen in, 
Lhude sing Goddamm, 
Raineth drop and staineth slop,  
And how the wind doth ramm!   
         Sing: Goddamm. 
Skiddeth bus and sloppeth us,  
An ague hath my ham,  
Freezeth river, turneth liver,  
          Damn you, sing: Goddamm.  
Goddamm, Goddamm, ‘tis why I am, Goddamm,  
          So gainst the winter’s balm.  
Sing goddamm, damm, sing Goddamm.  
Sing goddamm, sing goddamm, DAMM.  - Ezra Pound

Gary
March, 2015


PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed (as has my virtual friend, Elatia Harris)—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites: thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

5 Things to Look for Next Time You Buy a Cookbook 
(Emily Contois, at Zester Daily, on Nika Hazelton’s advice; it was good in 1963, and it still is)

American Food, Whatever That Is
(interview with Jonathan Gold and Robert Sietsema, on food and food writing)

Cherry Bombe
(biennial magazine on women and food)

Country Housewifes Family Companion, The
(facsimile edition of William Ellis’ 1750 book)

Diner Journal
(independent ad-free food magazine)

Early English Books Online: Text Creation Partnership (EEBO-TCP)
(searchable database of many old texts)

EARLY ENGLISH BREAD: Barm or sourdough?
(Jim Chevallier’s efforts to thresh out the truth about Medieval British baking)

Euell Gibbons: The Father of Modern Wild Foods 
(a short biography by John Kallas; see also John McPhee’s New Yorker profile of Gibbons)

Food and Romance: The Tissue of Little Things
(Dwight Furrow, writing at the intersection of the two primary hungers)

HANNAH GLASSE: Stolen Identity During the Eighteenth Century
(food writers might have a hard time today, but Victoria Rumble explains that it was once worse…)

How the Sense of Taste Has Shaped Who We Are
(“…John McQuaid on the science and history of flavor;” in Scientific American)

Mysteries of Chili Heat, The: Why People Love the Pain
(John McQuaid summarizes the latest scientific evidence, in Salon)

Regional Chinese Cooking
(Joe DiStefano’s series at Serious Eats:
More Than Ma La: A Deeper Introduction to Sichuan Cuisine

Secrets of Cantonese Cooking, The: America's First Chinese Cuisine
Song of Spice and Fire, A: The Real Deal With Hunan Cuisine)

Science of Saturated Fat, The: A Big Fat Surprise About Nutrition?
(Nina Teicholz, in The Independent, with good news for butter lovers)

Short Stack
(publisher of small single-subject cookbooks)

Toast
(e-zine; “a celebration of food & ideas”)

What Americans Can Learn from Other Food Cultures
(Amy Choi, via TED)

What Gives Wine its Color?
(Eleanor Shannon provides a brief introduction to the subject)

Why Lyon is Food Capital of the World
(Bill Buford, in The Guardian)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----

Curse of Modern Food Writing, The: The Dearth of Pleasure

Essay Expert, The

How Food Journalism Got as Stale as Day-Old Bread

It’s All About Trust and Ethics in Food Blogging


---- yet more blogs ----

China South of the Clouds

eat this poem 

Les Leftovers

Maureen B. Fant: Discovering Italy through its Food 

Science Meets Food


---- one changed URL ----

Red Cook


---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper) (Kindle)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper) (Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #173 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





The Libro-Emporium

Doorstops and lavatory entertainments abound in our book store.