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Food Sites for May 2015

Friday, April 17, 2015

The Hudson Valley’s first violets of the year.


‘tis May, almost, and we’re about to go on a big road-trip—one of our favorite things. There will be a lot of eating, audio books, eating, gawking at scenery, eating, taking thousands of photos, and possibly some more eating. Because we wont have much internet access,  Junes issue will likely be late and probably a little scrawny. You may, however, count yourself lucky if you are not among the few unfortunates who will be subjected to the traditional post-vacation soporific slide show.

My latest addition to Reaktion Books’ Edible series, Sausage: A Global History, (all about our favorite mystery meat) is complete, edited, indexed, and in their spring catalog. It will be released in September—along with Brian Yarvin’s Lamb: A Global History (between us, we’ll cover much of the succulent entrée category). Our next book, on preserved foods, has passed through its second edit and is current lounging on a desk somewhere in Greater London (it’s publication is a year or so away—so you'll have plenty of time to digest all that sausage and lamb).

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served,  directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter.  Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes from On the Table’s culinary quote collection are—like road-trips themselves—a mixed bag, a traveler’s pot-luck:

“When you come to a fork in the road, it’s time to eat.” Bob DelGrosso 
“I don’t think the road to heaven is paved with bean curd.” David Shaw 
 “He that travels in theory has no inconveniences; he has shade and sunshine at his disposal, and wherever he alights finds tables of plenty and looks of gaiety. These ideas are indulged till the day of departure arrives, the chaise is called, and the progress of happiness begins. A few miles teach him the fallacies of imagination. The road is dusty, the air is sultry, the horses are sluggish. He longs for the time of dinner that he may eat and rest. The inn is crowded, his orders are neglected, and nothing remains but that he devour in haste what the cook has spoiled, and drive on in quest of better entertainment. He finds at night a more commodious house, but the best is always worse than he expected.” Samuel Johnson 
“Las Vegas is Everyman’s cut-rate Babylon. Not far away there is, or was, a roadside lunch counter and over it a sign proclaiming in three words that a Roman emperor’s orgy is now a democratic institution... ‘Topless Pizza Lunch.’” Alistair Cooke

Gary
May, 2015

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites—thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and frankly amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

eatfeed
(“Food porn for the intellectual cook;” podcasts for people like us… who care, perhaps too much, about food)

Food Babe Blogger Is Full of Shit, The
(a real scientist, Yvette dEntremont, looks at the kind of pseudoscience that often appears in food blogs)

Food: The Newest Celebrity
(Megan Garber, in The Atlantic, on the kind of porn whose “…subjects are often actual pieces of meat…”)

How Snobbery Helped Take the Spice Out of European Cooking
(reflecting on flavor and history, from NPR)

Inside Louis’ Lunch, the 120-Year-Old Birthplace of the Hamburger
(Erin DeJesus on the historic New Haven eatery)

Interlibrary Snacking
(some food history from The New York Academy of Medicine)

Introduction of Chili Peppers to India, The
(Laura Kelley, the Silk Road Gourmet, traces their earliest appearance in written recipes)

Marlena Spieler
(a food writer & broadcaster’s site)

My Obsession: The Laurel Family
(Deborah Madison on the Lauraceae, with special attention to bay leaves and avocados)

Smoke: Why We Love It, for Cooking and Eating
(Jim Shahin waxes rhapsodic—and a little scientific—in The Washington Post)

Stupid Wine Journalism
(food and wine journalists beware—Dwight Furrow is paying attention)

Thai Food Glossary
(just a small part of Clay Irving’s huge recipe site)

Trash Food
(Chris Offutt on class, suspicion, guilt—in part revealed by what’s on our plates)

Why the Beef? Empire and Cuisine
(an essay by Rachel Laudan)

Writing Food History
(an outlined overview of the various directions the field can take, by Peter Scholliers)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----

How to Shine Blogging for a Single Reader!


---- yet another blog ----

Brian Yarvin


---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper) (Kindle)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper) (Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
PRE-ORDER

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #175 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





Food Sites for April 2015

Saturday, March 21, 2015
Is this news or crass hucksterism? Your call.


Despite what one poet had to say about the cruelness of April, this one promises to be especially kind around here. First, of course is that our wicked witch of a winter will be “really most sincerely dead.” Where’s the cruelty in that, Mr. Eliot?

This April, moreover, has even more good news for us. We were interviewed for an HBO special, Thought Crimes, which will premiere at the Tribeca Film festival this month. OUP is about to release The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets, which includes our lengthy article, “Insects.” OK, the news, so far is kinda’ creepy (and occasionally crawly)—but there is some tastier news.

My latest addition to Reaktion Books’ Edible series, Sausage: A Global History, (all about our favorite mystery meat) is complete, edited, indexed, and on its way to press. It is already listed online and will be included in Reaktion’s spring catalog (and at stand 6A109 of the London Book Fair, April 14-16).

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served,  directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the CornerWhile this newsletter is mostly about food, food history, food science, food writing—let’s face it, it’s about filling our faces and thinking about the process, before, during, and after the fact.

This month’s quotes from On the Table’s culinary quote collection are entirely self-serving. Well, mostly self-serving...

A highbrow is the kind of person who looks at a sausage and thinks of Picasso. Alan Patrick Herbert 
What? Sunday morning in an English family and no sausages? God bless my soul, what’s the world coming to? Dorothy Sayers 
Doctor, do you think it could have been the sausage? last words of Paul Claudel

Gary
April, 2015


PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites—thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. There’re You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

Basic Fare: Club Sandwiches
(Jan Whitaker dishes on the popular double-decker standby)
at NYC’s New School)

Celebrating a Hawaian Lu’au
(Jeanelle Kam and Rachel Laudan serve a detailed description of the preparation of this traditional feast)

Early Vegetarian Restaurants
(Jan Whitaker on some pre-hippie—that is, doomed—attempts at meatlessness)

Food & Food Preparation: Bread, Biscuit, Waffles & Wafers
(a slide show of eighteenth-century baking images and items)

Food and Back Migration: The Cornish Pasty Plot Thickens
(Rachel Laudan knocks the stuffing out another food fallacy)

FRENCH BREAD HISTORY: Gallo-Roman Bread
(more from bread historian Jim Chevallier)

History and Ritual of Brunch, The: with Farha Ternikar
(a video lecture, sponsored by Culinary Historians of New York and the Food Studies Program)

How the Apothecary Gave Birth to the Modern Cocktail Movement
(Warren Bobrow takes a cordial look at mixology in his Eater article)

How the Tudors Invented Breakfast
(Ian Mortimer in BBC History Magazine)

In Praise of the Chapaterati
(Claire Chambers on London’s curry houses)

Listening, Tasting, Reading, Touching: Interdisciplinary Histories of American Food
(four scholars take on the “inherent interdisciplinarity of food history;” at the American Historical Association’s annual meeting)

Taste-Based Medicine
(India Mandelkern looks at the connection between gastronomic and medical practices in various cultures)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----

Branding as a Writer, Rebranding as a Foodwriter


---- yet more blogs ----

Code of Eatics, A

Insatiable



---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)

Human Cuisine
(Paper

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #174 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





Foodsites for March 2015

Saturday, February 21, 2015



March is pretty much devoid of holidays, unless you count the First Day of Spring (which is usually a let-down for folks who have endured months of the kind of weather we’re seeing right now). We long for balmy days, sauntering through budding forests, stooping to pluck the occasional ramp or morel, or watching a dry fly drifting toward an especially cooperative brookie, while wildflowers nod on mossy banks, and soft breezes carry melodious birdsong. 

March provides none of that. 

What we do have is a window view of a snow-topped bird-feeder (surrounded by juncos, cardinals, downy woodpeckers, chickadees, and sparrows—so many greedy bickering sparrows), a warm house, soon to be filled with smell of slow-cooked foods suitable for the season, and the chance to forestall the onerous shoveling of snow by producing this newsletter.

Regular subscribers to this newsletter receive them from our blog, Just Served, directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner

This month’s quotation is not from On the Table’s culinary quote collection but, we feel, is more along the lines of venting:

Winter is icummen in, 
Lhude sing Goddamm, 
Raineth drop and staineth slop,  
And how the wind doth ramm!   
         Sing: Goddamm. 
Skiddeth bus and sloppeth us,  
An ague hath my ham,  
Freezeth river, turneth liver,  
          Damn you, sing: Goddamm.  
Goddamm, Goddamm, ‘tis why I am, Goddamm,  
          So gainst the winter’s balm.  
Sing goddamm, damm, sing Goddamm.  
Sing goddamm, sing goddamm, DAMM.  - Ezra Pound

Gary
March, 2015


PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed (as has my virtual friend, Elatia Harris)—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites: thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

5 Things to Look for Next Time You Buy a Cookbook 
(Emily Contois, at Zester Daily, on Nika Hazelton’s advice; it was good in 1963, and it still is)

American Food, Whatever That Is
(interview with Jonathan Gold and Robert Sietsema, on food and food writing)

Cherry Bombe
(biennial magazine on women and food)

Country Housewifes Family Companion, The
(facsimile edition of William Ellis’ 1750 book)

Diner Journal
(independent ad-free food magazine)

Early English Books Online: Text Creation Partnership (EEBO-TCP)
(searchable database of many old texts)

EARLY ENGLISH BREAD: Barm or sourdough?
(Jim Chevallier’s efforts to thresh out the truth about Medieval British baking)

Euell Gibbons: The Father of Modern Wild Foods 
(a short biography by John Kallas; see also John McPhee’s New Yorker profile of Gibbons)

Food and Romance: The Tissue of Little Things
(Dwight Furrow, writing at the intersection of the two primary hungers)

HANNAH GLASSE: Stolen Identity During the Eighteenth Century
(food writers might have a hard time today, but Victoria Rumble explains that it was once worse…)

How the Sense of Taste Has Shaped Who We Are
(“…John McQuaid on the science and history of flavor;” in Scientific American)

Mysteries of Chili Heat, The: Why People Love the Pain
(John McQuaid summarizes the latest scientific evidence, in Salon)

Regional Chinese Cooking
(Joe DiStefano’s series at Serious Eats:
More Than Ma La: A Deeper Introduction to Sichuan Cuisine

Secrets of Cantonese Cooking, The: America's First Chinese Cuisine
Song of Spice and Fire, A: The Real Deal With Hunan Cuisine)

Science of Saturated Fat, The: A Big Fat Surprise About Nutrition?
(Nina Teicholz, in The Independent, with good news for butter lovers)

Short Stack
(publisher of small single-subject cookbooks)

Toast
(e-zine; “a celebration of food & ideas”)

What Americans Can Learn from Other Food Cultures
(Amy Choi, via TED)

What Gives Wine its Color?
(Eleanor Shannon provides a brief introduction to the subject)

Why Lyon is Food Capital of the World
(Bill Buford, in The Guardian)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----

Curse of Modern Food Writing, The: The Dearth of Pleasure

Essay Expert, The

How Food Journalism Got as Stale as Day-Old Bread

It’s All About Trust and Ethics in Food Blogging


---- yet more blogs ----

China South of the Clouds

eat this poem 

Les Leftovers

Maureen B. Fant: Discovering Italy through its Food 

Science Meets Food


---- one changed URL ----

Red Cook


---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper) (Kindle)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper) (Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover) (Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #173 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





Foodsites for February 2015

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Right now, it might feel about as far from Spring as can be imagined, but we’re about to put all of our faith in the prognostications of rodent in Pennsylvania. 


February, an otherwise dismal month, attempts to be relieved by several holidays.

In the US we have President’s Day (which used to be two holidays, until the powers-that-be decided that two holidays constituted entirely too much fun). As a child I remember that Washington’s Birthday was always celebrated with a homemade cherry pie, but today it just seems to be an excuse for sales of all sorts of items we don’t actually need.

The other two holidays (the ones that don’t provide days off) celebrate—appropriately enough—possibly unrequited longing: Valentine’s Day and Groundhog Day. The folks who invented the calendar must have realized how depressing February can be—otherwise, why would they have made it the shortest month?

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served, directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. 


You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner

In honor of Groundhog Day (when, each year, we substitute desperate hope for bitter experience), we’ll extract something about Marmota monax from On the Table’s culinary quote collection


As I came home through the woods with my string of fish, trailing my pole, it being now quite dark, I caught a glimpse of a woodchuck stealing across my path, and felt a strange thrill of savage delight, and was strongly tempted to seize and devour him raw; not that I was hungry then, except for that wildness which he represented. Henry David Thoreau

Gary
February 2015

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed (as has my virtual friend, Karen Resta)—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites—thanks, and keep them coming!


PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

American Menu, The
(historic musings from menu collector Henry B. Voigt)

Behind the Recipe -- Jeri Quinzio
(food history from the author of Of Sugar and Snow: A History of Ice Cream Making)

Books, Food & History 
(site of the University of Amsterdam’s Special Collection on the History of Food)

Brief History of the French Baguette, A
(the classic French loaf is not as ancient as we might think…)

Cook in Colonial Africa, A
(Cynthia Bertelsen, on what it was like for tropical cooks to prepare typical British meals)

Cookbook of Unknown Ladies, The
(“Curious recipes and hidden histories from Westminster City Archives”)

Eat Your History: A Shared Table
(food history from down under)

Forgotten Cuisines of America
(Robert Sietsema’s exploration of the eclectic roots of American food, in Gourmet
Part 1: The Barrier Islands of South Carolina
Part 2: The Hmong
Part 3: Silicon Valley
Part 4: Tex-Mex
Part 5: Tex-Mex
Part 6: German-American)

Historic Cooking School
(Rena Goff on cookbooks—with many links to free e-versions, historic kitchens, and food museums)

Historic Foodie, The
(site of Martin & Victoria Rumble; foodwriting, bookselling, and historic recreating in the Appalachians)

Homo Gastronomicus
(thinking about eating, mostly British eating)

How Coffee Fueled the Civil War
(not your typical war story; from War History Online)

How I Became a Food Historian 
(Rachel Laudan tells all…)

Hushpuppy Nation 
(American food, southern style)

La Cocina Histórica
(exploring the collection of Mexican cookbooks at The University of Texas at San Antonio)

On Food and History 
(Lynn Nelson on food news, historic cookbooks, films that feature food, and suchlike tasty topics)

On MSG and Chinese Restaurant Syndrome
(Harold McGee puts another food fallacy to rest)

On the Idea of Novelty in Cuisine: A Brief Historical Insight 
(Bénédict Beaugé, in the International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science)

Short History of the Dining Room, A (Part 1)
(Christine Baumgarthuber’s article in The New Inquiry)

Tiny Bubbles: Where Food Met Science, Medicine, and Religion
(Rachel Laudan effervesces about the mostly Western fascination with aerated food and drink)

Why Black Eyed Peas? Why Greens?
(Michael W. Twitty on some southern staple foods; at Afroculinaria)

Why the Kitchen Computing Dream of the 80s Never Caught On
(Maureen Ryan on a bit of techie nostalgia for something that never really happened)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----

Amazon Is Not the Reader’s Friend, Says Debate Audience

Confusion Among Bloggers on Disclosing Compensation

Has Your Content Been Stolen? A Lawyer’s Guide To Defending Your Online Content

Mark Strand: Living Gorgeously

Questions from a Recipe Copy Editor

What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades


---- yet another blog ----

Opusculum


---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper), (Kindle)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover), (Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover), (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper), (Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover), (Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #172 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





Food Sites for January 2015

Thursday, December 25, 2014

Not what it looks like outside our door right now… 
but it’s only a matter of time.


January is named for the Roman god of doorways, and has two faces—one for looking forward and one for looking back. Janus seems quite appropriate for those of us who write about food, especially food historians. We’re always trying new things, but thinking about them in the context of the past. On the other hand, for those of us who have also raised children, the Roman god Edusa might deserve some supplication. She was responsible for getting the young ones to eat their veggies (and anything else they might reject untasted).

Despite the fact that feasting might have lost some of its appeal after all our holiday meals, this issue is—once again—over-stuffed. If it’s any consolation, the updates newsletters are always 100% calorie, cholesterol, gluten, and trans-fat free.

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served, directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

It’s a media tradition—around this time—to revisit major events of the past year. Bowing to peer pressure, On the Table’s culinary quote collection serves up it’s own leftover dish:

I was trying new green vegetables on my dog, Mabon. So, with all this talk that you could hardly survive without eating kale three times a day, I decided to try a little bit. I stir-fried it and put three little clumps in his dish. And he sniffed each clump, picked each one up and put it over there, and there, and there—and walked away. I was proud of him. Good boy! Judith Jones

Gary
January 2015


PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed (as has my friend Cynthia Bertelsen)—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites—thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

American Food History Project, The
(a series of exhibits at the Smithsonian; podcasts and videos)

Beyond Casserole: Mapping Out The Countrys Funeral Food Traditions
(regional variations on preferred comfort[ing] foods)

Bibliography of Sub-Saharan African Cookery Books
(link to downloadable Word document)

Boiling Fish
(Leanne Ogasawara on scent, memory, Marseilles, and the making of bouillabaisse; in 3 Quarks Daily)

Bread in the Middle Ages
(history, and a couple of recipes)

California Taco Trail, The: How Mexican Food Conquered America
(Carolina Miranda’s report on NPR)

Cara De Silva
(website of one very busy food journalist/historian/public speaker/editor/teacher)

Chef Leticia
(website & blog of expatriate Brazilian chef and cookbook author, Leticia Moreinos Schwartz)

Dobby’s Signature
(recipes from Nigeria)

Feats of Clay: The Role of the Qvevri in Georgian Winemaking
(Doug Wregg’s article about a traditional method of fermenting wine—in the Caucasus, where wine was first made—but is not at all like wine production anywhere else)

Food Borne Illness Prevention
(comprehensive list of links to pathogens and their medical implications, as well as federal and local regulations and standards for controlling them)

Graduate Association for Food Studies, The
(from Boston University’s Gastronomy Program and Harvard University, with far-flung faculty advisors from across the spectrum of food scholarship)

Grape Collective
(wine magazine)

History Cook, The: Food of Christmas Past
(a day in the kitchen with Ivan Day)

Human Ancestors Were Consuming Alcohol 10 Million Years Ago
(Carl Engelking, on genetic clues about our ability to metabolize booze, in Discover)

Hungry African, A
(African recipe site)

Italian Deli Meats
(“a journey through flavor, renewed nutritional quality and health benefits of a symbol of Italian culinary art;” PDF)

Meat Fermentation at the Crossroads of Innovation and Tradition: A Historical Outlook
(report by Frédéric Leroy, Anneke Geyzen, Maarten Janssens, Luc De Vuyst, and Peter Scholliers in Trends in Food Science & Technology)

Mzansi Style Cuisine
(modern South African recipes)

PAXIMADIA: Barley Biscuits Past and Present
(a traditional food of Crete)

Preserving Tradition: Appalachian Food Storybank Collects Tales of Mountain Meals
(“…a project of the Heritage Food Committee of Slow Foods Asheville,” North Carolina)

Roosevelt Family Built a New York Coffee Chain 50 Years Before Starbucks, The
(Jancee Dunn’s article in the Smithsonian Magazine)

Shrooming in Late Capitalism: The Way of the Truffle
(a personal account, and some history, of Tuber melanosporum & magnatum – with a soupcon of lesser-known truffle genera: Terfezia & Tirmania)

Special Sauce for Measuring Food Trends: The Fried Calamari Index
(Neil Irwin on the way certain foods rise from obscurity to cult status, then become so familiar that they are no longer mentioned in The New York Times)

Suzy Homemaker, a Slice of Life from the 1960s
(Judith Gradwohl’s article, on a Smithsonian exhibit that uses a domestic toy to revisit a turbulent moment in our domestic history)

Taste of Tanzania
(Miriam Kinunda’s site about Swahili food and culture)

Viennese Delights: Remarks on the History of Food and Sociability in Eighteenth-Century Central Europe
(David Do Paço’s paper, published as part of the Max Weber Programme  of the European University Institute)

Visit to the Kitchen of Legendary Cookbook Editor Judith Jones, A
(Charlotte Druckman’s article in The Wall Street Journal)

Why Kant Was Wrong About Food
(Dwight Furrow provides philosophical justification for our intellectual fascination with the things we stuff in our mouths)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----

Caught Between Gefilte Fish and Campbell’s Soup

Self-Publishing is Self-Correcting

Working for Free Has Value at Each Stage of a Career


---- yet more blogs ----

Adventures in Bread Making

Amuse-Bouches, Intermèdes et Mignardises

Chef Afrik

Come. Con. Ella.

Daily Dish

Emiko Davies

Food Lover’s Feast, A

foodgeekology

It Takes a Kitchen

Life in the Food Lane

My Darling Lemon Thyme

My Mission: Tastes of SF

Salad for President

Science and Food 


---- thats all for now ----

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The Resource Guide for Food Writers


The Herbalist in the Kitchen


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Human Cuisine


Herbs: A Global History


Terms of Vegery


How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating




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The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #171 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author'‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





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