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Food Sites for November 2017

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Something from Rabelais, the Patron Saint of Holiday Excess.

The holiday season—or, as we like to call it, La Grande Bouffe—is about to descend upon us, appropriately enough, in the form of an all-devouring beast. There’s little we can do to stop this devastating assault on our carefully-composed diets, the resulting avoirdupois, or our gastrointestinal well-being... but, at least, none of the text of this newsletter has any caloric value.

Unless, of course, one is seduced by some of these websites  charms, in which case, all bets are off.

Oh well... there’s always January, the month of remorse.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection reflect some ambivalence about the centerpiece of a certain holiday.

TURKEY: This bird has various meanings depending on the action in your dream. If you saw one strutting and/or heard it gobbling, it portends a period of confusion due to instability of your friends or associates. However, if you ate it, you are likely to make a serious error in judgment.  Barbara Condrony 
TURKEY, n. A large bird whose flesh when eaten on certain religious anniversaries has the peculiar property of attesting piety and gratitude. Incidentally, it is pretty good eating.  Ambrose Bierce 
Turkey is undoubtedly one of the best gifts that the New World has made to the Old.  Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin 
Turkey takes so much time to chew. The only thing I ever give thanks for at Thanksgiving is that Ive swallowed it.  Sam Greene

Gary
November, 2017

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out tasty sites (like Dianne Jacob), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(the Cotton MS Vitellius C III, in the collection of the British Library; text is in Old—which is to say, Anglo-Saxon—English, but includes a link to a modern English translation, available for purchase)

(Heather Arndt Anderson waxes nostalgic, at Taste, about a vegetable that has lost most of its former glamour)

(“Chinese recipes and eating culture”...with an emphasis on the foods of Sichuan and Shanxi)

(Pritha Sen, at LiveMint, on the source of hotness in Indian dishes, before the arrival of New World chiles)

(John Leavitt’s attempt to resolve—graphically—the endless arguments about what is, or is not, a sandwich)

(Via Dutton, at Literary Hub, savors a dessert of foie gras, sprinkled with ideas about food and guilt)

(downloadable resource compiled under the supervision of Dr. Allen J. Grieco)

(Fabio Parasecoli reviews Steffan Igor Ayora-Diaz’s Cooking Technology: Transformation in Culinary Practice in Mexico and Latin America, for Huffpost)

(archive of stories and podcasts from the Southern Foodways Alliance)

(Irakli Loladze has found a mathematical connection between rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and imbalance of micro-nutrients and carbohydrates in the world’s food supply)

(a map, from VinePair, that only hints at the complexity of the subject)

(Mackensie Griffin, at Eater, on how the eating habits of sleuths tell us who they are)

(the BBC’s Theodora Sutcliffe on a curious connection between history and charcuterie)

(Nora Ephron gushes, in The New Yorker, over the mechanical bliss of Krispy Kreme)

(a YouTube video from Japanology)

(high tech methods have made The Netherlands the capital of modern farming; article by Frank Viviano in National Geographic)

(Brian Handwerk, at the Smithsonian, on research into what makes some of us turn up our noses)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----




---- yet another blog ----



---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #205 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2017 by Gary Allen.



Food Sites for October 2017

Friday, September 15, 2017

The winds of change: The last Howard Johnson restaurant left, in Lake George Village, NY

Autumn is a time for reflection on the passing of things. It’s no accident that many of the world’s religions mark the season with remembrance and re-evaluation. It’s also a time when we start to think about dishes we’ve missed for months—sometimes,for years. Is that a descent into frivolous nostalgia? Perhaps, but we don’t care; bring on the comfort food!

We learned, right after the last issue went out, that Food52 had posted one of our recipes. Since there’s still plenty of fresh corn available, check it out. Also, Roll Magazine has posted two of our articles, Dipping into History, about chips & dips, and another about onion soup.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection are about looking back, an activity which may— or may not—be conducive to the production of written words.

All the gifts are nothing. Money gets used up. Clothes you rip up. Toys get broken up. But a good meal, that stays in your memory. From there it doesn’t get lost like other gifts. The body it leaves fast, but the memory slow.   Meir Shalev 
Food is about agriculture, about ecology, about mans relationship with nature, about the climate, about nation-building, cultural struggles, friends and enemies, alliances, wars, religion. It is about memory and tradition and, at times, even about sex.  Mark Kurlansky 
Ponder well on this point: the pleasant hours of our life are all connected by a more or less tangible link, with some memory of the table.  Charles Pierre Monselet 
Smell brings to mind... a family dinner of pot roast and sweet potatoes during a myrtle-mad August in a Midwestern town. Smells detonate softly in our memory like poignant land mines hidden under the weedy mass of years. Diane Ackerman

October, 2017

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out tasty sites (like Dianne Jacob), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(a suggestion of the kind of dishes Jules Gouffé produced—which, hard to believe, are simpler than those of Carême)

(follow Luke Spencer, at Messy Nessy, in pursuit of a little nosh)

(Jenn Sit, at Serious Eats, on the names—and variations—of over-sized sandwiches across the US, plus a tiny nod in the direction of the UK)

(Megan Gannon, at Mental Floss, describes recent experiments that aim to discover what those sailors’ food was really like)

(an excerpt about the historical effects of antibiotics on part of our food supply from Maryn McKenna’s book; on NPR’s The Salt)

(everything you could want to know about the wheys and means of cheese; from Cheese Science)

(a frothy timeline by John Hawthorne, at beergifts.com)

(chef/proprietor Vivian Howard, in Saveur, explains how a 500-pound mistake led to the rediscovery of her North Carolinian culinary roots)

(guide to the special collections at Duke University)

(Paul Freedman, in Yale Alumni Magazine, on how our current preoccupation with food came to be)

(Jan Whitaker, of Restaurant-ing Through History, uses developments in restaurant trends to address recent ethical concerns over this bit of gastronomic nomenclature)

(Meghan McCarron, at Eater, on kaiseki’s influence on nouvelle cuisine)

(Devra Ferst’s annotated list from Saveur)

(a suggestion of the kind of dishes Jules Gouffé produced—which, hard to believe, are simpler than those of Carême)

(Sarah Whitman-Salkin, for Edible Manhattan, visits the collection of The New York Academy of Medicine)

(Mexican cuisine, served via podcasts, magazine, tutorials, recipes)

(a podcast, with links, from Gastropod)

(the low-down on down-home legumes, from the Sustainable Mountain Agriculture Center Inc.)

(“edible wild plants that you didn’t know you can eat;“ by Colin Smith at Basis Gear)

(“Wine production in the Middle Ages,” from Elizabeth Chadwick at The History Girls)

(Eileen Reynolds plates some history at Extra Crispy)

(short answer: they skip taxes and middlemen; from Jenny Hughes, at Frenchly)

(Tina Hesman Saey, at Science News, reports on yeasty experiments bubbling away in labs and breweries)

(a guide from Slow Food)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----









---- yet more blogs ----




---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs:

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #204 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2017 by Gary Allen.



Food Sites for September 2017

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

You can’t tell from this, but it’s almost time to harvest wine grapes...

Late summer, early Fall, call it what you will—its bumper crop time for almost everything. Tomatoes, corn, beans, summer squashes, stone fruits, and the earliest apple varieties. Of course its only the beginning—but we should enjoy what we have now, and deal with the surpluses of Autumn when we get there. Meanwhile well just pack jars and freezer containers with everything we can’t stuff in our mouths.

We’re still plugging away on our non-foodish novel... so, other than grilling, taking lots of photos, assembling these newsletters, and wasting time on social media, we’ve done nothing of interest lately. Actually, we did write one food article for Roll Magazine, but it hasn’t posted yet.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection reflect another of the things that have kept us from pursuing any activity that might suggest productivity.

A bottle of wine contains more philosophy than all the books in the world. Louis Pasteur 
Drink wine every day, at lunch and dinner, and the rest will take care of itself. Waverly Root 
Cheese that is compelled by law to append the word 'food' to its title does not go well with red wine or fruit. Fran Lebowitz
A fruit is a vegetable with looks and money.Plus, if you let fruit rot, it turns into wine, something Brussels sprouts never do. P. J. O’Rourke


September, 2017

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out juicy sites (like Renee Marton), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Chase Purdy, at Quartz, on some of the demographics behind the popularity of these condiments)

(Todd reviews restaurants in Chicago, but also opines amusingly on the life, loves, and loathes of being a restaurant critic)

(Katheryn C. Twiss, in Anthropology News, updates Brillat-Savarin with the evidence that we have always been what we eat)

(Oldways provides a sample of research being done by Daniel McElligott, a consultant with the Cheese Coalition)

(an archive of cheesy articles from The Kitchn)

(Sanjiv Khamgaonkar, at CNN, on the history—and evolution—of Chinese food in the subcontinent)

(Mona Lazar, in her Pickled Spruit blog, analyzes the structure, methodology, and impact of these supposedly simple images)

(Dwight Furrow establishes approaches for negotiating a path through a complicated set of subjects)
(Natasha Geiling writes about indigenous hops and their place in American brewing for The Smithsonian)

(Clint Rainey writes, for Bloomberg, about government efforts to get us to eat more cheese)

(1866 book by “Malinda Russell, An Experienced Cook;” thanks to the University of Michigan Library)

(Anoothi Vishal, in The Wire, laments the loss of dishes caused by the great disruptions of 1947)

(Riccardo Meggiato explains the slow chemical magic that converts a pig’s hind leg into prosciutto or serrano ham)

(microbiologist Ron Dunn is examining 1,000 sourdough starters, from around the world to see what lives in them, how it got there, and what effect these populations have on the finished bread; some of these organisms might even come from the bakers’ bodies)

(an archive of articles on the subject, from Garden & Gun)

(Hari Balasubramanian, at 3 Quarks Daily, on  “Nixtamalization, Planting Techniques [The Milpa], and Journeys in North America”)

(John Edwards and Adam Dicaprio explain the science behind intentionally-sour brews)

(Katy June Friesen interviews Jeffrey M. Pilcher for an answer in The Smithsonian)

(Craig Cavallo, in Conde Nast’s Traveler, on what we drank before wine, beer, and whiskey were the quaffs of choice in the US)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----









---- yet more blogs ----





---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #203 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2017 by Gary Allen.



Food Sites for August 2017

Friday, July 14, 2017

Summer is burgers-on-the-grill season... but, apparently, also faux-burgers-in-cupcake-form season.
This once-bitten example was not shy about being a production of Mary Ann Williams, for the Brooktondale Market, near Ithaca, NY.

It’s summer, so we spend a lot of time on the road. This gives us the opportunity to try many regional beers and local variations on the hamburger theme. So far, the most interesting one was layered with bacon, sliced jalapeños, and pimento cheese. Some day we’ll post photos of the beer cans and bottles we’ve sampled, as we seem to be living in the golden age of “artisanal” beers and—even more—artisanal labels.

We’ve been distracted from writing about food lately (a non-foodish novel has been taking up our time, instead). So, no new links of our own; just the usual monthly potluck, below.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection are about some of the surrogates we are invited to ingest. They are amusing in much the same the way that gallows humor amuses us.
We are living in a world today where lemonade is made from artificial flavors and furniture polish is made from real lemons. Alfred E. Newman
We were taken to a fast-food cafe where our order was fed into a computer. Our hamburger, made from the flesh of chemically impregnated cattle, had been broiled over counterfeit charcoal, placed between slices of artificially flavored cardboard and served to us by recycled juvenile delinquents. Jean Michel Chapereau
Banquet: a plate of cold, hairy chicken and artificially coloured green peas completely surrounded by dreary speeches and appeals for donations. Bennett A. Cerf
 Gary
August, 2017

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out juicy sites (like Nicola Miller), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(BBC interview with Barbara Ketcham-Wheaton)

(Wyatt Williams revisits John McPhee’s Oranges, in Oxford American)

(Amanda Banacki Perry, in the blog of the American Historical Association, takes a fresh look at culinary assimilation and asks, “...is an authentic cuisine even possible?”)

(thirteen old cookbooks, from Portugal and Brazil, in Portuguese)

(Julia Turshen, in The New York Times, reviews Susan Bright’s Feast for the Eyes: The Story of Food in Photography)

(episode three in The Pickled Spruit’s “Food in Books” series, by Mona Lazar)

(Ben Panko, in The Smithsonian, on the history of baking powder, with a nod to Linda Civitello’s book, Baking Powder Wars)

(Caitlin Dewey, in The Washington Post, on efforts “...to differentiate ‘true’ craft beers...” from mass-produced pretenders; needless to say, the big companies are fighting back)

(Joachim Kalka‘s article, in The Paris Review, on literary accounts of grand edible structures in the form of cakes)

(Ed Yong writes about a study that suggests that much of what we think we know about nutrition might not be accurate for everyone; an article in The Atlantic)

(Bee Wilson, in The Observer, on how the internet has changed the way recipes travel and evolve—for better or worse)

(Dan Rosenhec, in The Economist, wonders if all the hullabaloo about wine tasting has any basis in reality)

(a podcast from the BBC on “...how cookery books have been used to demonstrate power, strengthen colonial and soviet ideology, and divide society by class and race”)

(Laura Carlson, at Atlas Obscura, on the feminist origin—in St. Louis, of all places—of these preprandial revelries)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----






---- yet more blogs ----




---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)


Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...
...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #202 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2017 by Gary Allen.



The Libro-Emporium

Doorstops and lavatory entertainments abound in our book store.