Subscribe

Through the wonders of modern telegraphy, you may now receive updates from this site in your electro-mailbox. Simply enter your email address below:


Or subscribe via RSS.

Archives

Food Sites for November 2109

Monday, October 14, 2019

The pumpkin spice harvest is in full swing...

November is fast approachingand with it, the season of immense turkeys and slabs of pumpkin pie and (for those who share our particular set of nostalgia genes) additional slices of mince or pecan pie. We’re entering the foothills of our Great Sierra of Surfeit—the seasonal holiday dinner circuit—and must begin training soon if we are to survive its excesses.

If anyone actually reads through all this newsletter, they might discover a new category of links. Socrates might have opined “know thyself,” but he never said we mustn’t laugh while doing so. 

Speaking of knowing oneself... we’ve self-published yet another kindle book. The Digressions of Dr Sanscravat: Gastronomical Ramblings & Other Diversions is a thinly disguised memoir that pretends to be an annotated collection of essays by a cranky old guy who may be familiar to folks who get this newsletter.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Motivation is everything, and (around here, at least) “motivation” is spelled “C.A.F.F.E.I.N.E.” Here are a few more cups from On the Table’s culinary quote collection:

I pretty much drink a cup of coffee, write in my journal for a while, and then sit at a computer in my office and torture the keys. Jess Walter
I’d rather take coffee than compliments just now. Louisa May Alcott
It is inhumane, in my opinion, to force people who have a genuine medical need for coffee to wait in line behind people who apparently view it as some kind of recreational activity. Dave Barry
In Seattle, you haven’t had enough coffee until you can thread a sewing machine while it’s running. Jeff Bezos
Gary
November, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Suzanne Fass), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


— the new sites —

(Emma Betuel writes about the Chinese obsession with Cordyceps—a type of fungus-infected caterpillars that may, or may not, have certain powers—for Inverse)

(Renee Ghert-Zand’s article, in The Times of Israel, about Genie Milgrom’s Sephardic cookbook, Recipes of My 15 Grandmothers: Unique Recipes and Stories from the Times of the Crypto-Jews during the Spanish Inquisition)

(overview by Jeffrey P. Miller and Jonathan Deutsch)

(Lina Zeldovich, in JSTOR Daily, on the never-ending archaeological argument over beer vs bread as the incentive for ancient agriculture)

(Jeff Opperman’s questionable—but amusing—research into the origins of his favorite quaff; for Outside Online)

(Anna Journey, “reimagining the mushroom” for The Believer)

(Daniela Galarza’s guide to the baked goods of Mexico City, for Eater)

(Taste’s Chris Crowley brings pasta salad history to the cook-out)

(Lauren Mowery’s article in WineEnthusiast)

(Debal Deb writes about one nation’s efforts to preserve an essential crop’s genetic diversity, in Scientific American; subscription required)

(full text of Donna R. Gabaccia’s 1998 book, as a PDF)

(Tanya Lewis interviews physiologist David Julius, for Scientific American)

(Erin Blakemore, in JSTOR Daily, on the fake nostalgia Americans love so much... even long before Norman Rockwell based a career of it)

(Liora Gvion‘s article tracking the way cookbooks have historically mirrored changes in ethnicity in American life; in Food, Culture and Society)

(Luisa Torres interviews Lenore Newman—author of Lost Feast: Culinary Extinction and the Future of Food—for NPR’s The Salt)


— inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers —


















— a little gallows humor —




— more blogs —




— that’s all for now —

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose, ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

How to Write a Great Book
(Kindle)

The Digressions of Dr Sanscravat: Gastronomical Ramblings & Other Diversions
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #229 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.


Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.

Food Sites for October 2019

Sunday, September 15, 2019

Summer isn’t going to last forever... 
better fry up those green tomatoes before it’s too late!


October is almost upon us. We’ve already begun to use the oven... something that was unimaginable only a week ago. Soon, pies and stews and roasts and casseroles will become our daily fare... and the forlorn grill will be bundled-up to wait out the winter.

Our blog Just Served, has posted an article (“A Few Words About Salt”), an excerpt from our book, Sauces Reconsidered: Après Escoffier.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Since, for some reason, we can’t seem to banish pie from our consciousness at the moment, we might as well hack out a slice (or four) from On the Table’s culinary quote collection:

If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe. Carl Sagan
My mother didn’t really cook. But she did make key lime pie, until the day the top of the evaporated milk container accidentally ended up in the pie and she decided cooking took too much concentration. William Norwich
[The (apple) pie should be eaten] while it is yet florescent, white or creamy yellow, with the merest drip of candied juice along the edges (as if the flavor were so good to itself that its own lips watered!), of a mild and modest warmth, the sugar suggesting jelly, yet not jellied, the morsels of apple neither dissolved nor yet in original substance, but hanging as it were in a trance between the spirit and the flesh of applehood... then, O blessed man, favored by all the divinities! eat, give thanks, and go forth, “in apple-pie order!” Henry Ward Beecher
When you die, if you get a choice between going to regular heaven or pie heaven, choose pie heaven. It might be a trick, but if it’s not, mmmmmmmm, boy. Jack Handey
Gary
October, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Jonell Galloway), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


— the new sites —

(draft of a paper by Andrea Borghini and Tommaso Piazza—"a metaphysical account” of the experience of tasting wine)

(Helen Rosner interviews José R. Ralat for The New Yorker’s “Annals of Gastronomy”)

(Yasmin Tayag, at INVERSE, reveals the findings from a 1.2 million-year-old molar; spoiler alert: it’s grain)

(Cynthia Shafer-Elliott, in Biblical Archaeology, on another exercise in experimental archaeology)

(downloadable PDF of paper by Charles Smith, Barry Smith, and Malika Auvtay, published in Perceptions and Its Modalities)

(8,600 year-old evidence reported in Archaeology News Network)

(Michael Walkdenm at the Folger Library’s Shakespeare & Beyond, on what was then—and sometimes now—considered a “notoriously treacherous... source of food”)

(archive of results of prosecutions of violators of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act; over 30,000 cases of food alone, sortable by key words, defendants, courts, and dates)

(a chef’s site—with jobs, recipes, a great cheese encyclopedia, and more)

(Gastro Observer’s Anne Ewbank reports on archaeological evidence that Britons were eating cheese before they evolved the gene that prevented lactose intolerance)

(Russell Hotten’s article for BBC News)

(Thomas Triedman writes about Hogarth’s take on the degradation of eighteenth-century England for New Criterion)

(concise version of the 17th century’s innovations; at French website, gastronomos)

(Robert Nicholas Spengler’s paper, in Frontiers in Plant Science, on the evolution and domestication of the world’s best-known fruit)

(more good news: MDlinx’s summary of a paper published in the journal Gastroenterology)

(Andrew Zaleski’s account of a visit with Ben Jacobsen, for Bloomberg Businessweek)

(Farmer Lee Jones and Chefs Garden’s lab studies agricultural science’s effect on flavor, from soil microbes to the nutrient content of produce)

(Khalil Gibran Muhammad’s story, in The New York Times, is anything but sweet)

(Gabriella Petrick serves it up—without entering the cheddar cheese vs à la mode fray—for Smithsonian Magazine)


— inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers —







— more blogs —



— that’s all for now —

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear in them is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

How to Write a Great Book
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #228 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.


A Few Words about Salt

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

It’s almost impossible to discuss sauces without mentioning sodium chloride. Salt is so important that the very words “sauce” and “salsa” (not to mention “sausage,” “salary,” and “salubrious”) are derived, ultimately, from the Latin “sal,” for salt. It is so basic that the Cynic, Antiphanes, was quoted in The Deipnosophistae of Athenaeus: “Of the relishes which come from the sea we always have one, and that day in, day out. I mean salt.” (Book 9, p. 161)

It’s not a coincidence that Matthew 5:13-16, has Jesus saying: “Ye are the salt of the earth: but if the salt have lost his savour, wherewith shall it be salted? It is thenceforth good for nothing, but to be cast out, and to be trodden under foot of men.” We are nothing if we’re not “worth our salt”—and neither are our sauces.

This is not just a Western concept. The ancient Chinese had a saying: “Oh salt, he is a General in the Chinese cuisine” … This saying, used earlier but recorded by Ban Gu during the Eastern Han Dynasty (25-220 CE), shows the importance of salt in all sauces.

Salt crystals bring cultural meanings and give people food choices in sauce manufacture. Salt supplements enhance each sauce, and Chinese food preparation reflects people's affection for sauce and salt in their lives. In China, people do not get their salt from a salt shaker. They get theirs using many different sauces as they prepare their dishes. Thus, in China, salt and sauce are great partners.(Zhou Hongcheng).

Salt is essential to life for all of us (animals travel miles just for a chance to lick soil containing even a trace of salt). However, for anyone afflicted by hypertension, too much salt can be dangerous. Fortunately, excess salt is eliminated by the kidneys of healthy people, so—for them, at least—warnings about NaCl’s dangers should be taken with a grain of you-know-what.


This excerpt from Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier (Rowman & Littlefield Studies in Food and Gastronomy, 2019), and the illustration above—which is not part of the book—are protected by copyright, and may not be republished in any form without prior permission.

Food Sites for September 2019

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Black coffee... writing’s rocket fuel.

It’s almost September, as we write, so it’s still hot... but we can sense what’s coming. Fortunately, before the grim part of the year arrives, we get to celebrate the bounty of the harvest. Our gardens (or farmers’ markets) are gloriously replete with fresh produce... produce we won’t see again for a long time (unless it’s a pale substitute, picked someplace far, far, away).

The Rambling Epicure has published an article (“Cutting the Mustard”), which is actually an excerpt from our book, Sauces Reconsidered: Après Escoffier.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

On the off-chance that you aren’t already convinced that caffeine is essential to our production of (often excess) verbiage, gulp down a few cups from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

A mathematician is a device for turning coffee into theorems. Paul Erdos
Coffee: we can get it anywhere, and get as loaded as we like on it, until such teeth-chattering, eye-bulging, nonsense-gibbering time as we may be classified unable to operate heavy machinery. Joan Frank
As soon as coffee is in your stomach, there is a general commotion. Ideas begin to move... similes arise, the paper is covered. Coffee is your ally and writing ceases to be a struggle. Charles Maurice de Talleyrand
Coffee isn’t my cup of tea. Samuel Goldwyn
Gary
September, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Cara De Silva), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


— the new sites —

(The Guardian reports on a recent discovery of written evidence of the first scotch whisky still)

(scanned copy of A. M. & J. Ferguson’s 1892 book)

(Anne Ewbank’s beautifully illustrated review of Amy Goldman’s book, The Melon, in Gastro Obscura)

(Linda Rodriguez McRobbie, at Mental Floss, on a now nearly forgotten food journalist: Clementine Paddleford)

(Gary Paul Nabhan explains the similarities between Mexican and Arabic cuisines—and their historic connection through the Canary Islands—for AramcoWorld)

(Nathan Yau’s moving analysis of USDA data for the years 1970-2013; at Flowingdata)

(Rebekah Kebede, on the societal causes of food preference, for National Geographic)

(Jenny G. Zhang, asks—for Eater—how they actually did it)

(Franz Lidz, in Smithsonian Magazine, provides new evidence of the flavors’ antiquity)

(Reina Gattuso, at GastroObscura, on Salma Yusuf Husain’s book The Mughal Feast)

(Liz Susman Karp’s Mental Floss article; it includes the first appearance in print of a recipe for chocolate cake)

(Inverse’s Mike Brown on a taste-test of patties grown from a few stem cells)

(Feijun Tan, at RADII, describes thirteen varieties)

(Fabio Parasecoli’s essay from Roberta Sassatelli’s collection Italians and Food)

(Alexandra Pattillo interviews Robert Lustig and Marion Nestle for inverse to find out)

(Alastair Sooke, describes for The Telegraph, “a feast of a show that reveals what the Romans really ate”)

(Fran Kuzui and Phoebe Amoroso explain nihonshu and discuss sake, Tokyo style, for Culinary Backstreets)

(descriptions of hundreds of cheeses, plus cheese festivals)

(Adam Chandler travels our new McWorld in a quest for fast food for Literary Hub)

(Barry Smith explain, in the Proceedings of Wine Active Compounds 2008, why the flavor of wines can vary—even if they contain the same flavor compounds—"because of differences in their thresholds of perception”)

(Emily Matchar, at The Smithsonian, on William A. Mitchell, the chemist responsible for artificial tapioca, Cool Whip, instant Jell-O, Pop Rocks, and Tang)

(Huffington Post’s Lee Breslouer interviews butchers about the realities of their work)

(the low-down from New Mexico State University’s Chile Pepper Institute)

(Veronique Greenwood, in BBC’s future, pays a visit to a sourdough library in Belgium’s Centre for Bread Flavour)

(Barry Smith—from the School of Advanced Study, University of London, Institute of Philosophy—on how complex a wine tasting experience can be)

(Tracy Saelinger’s answer at Kitchn)

(Barry Smith asks the hard questions at The World of the Mind)

(Eater’s Nina Li Coomes waxes rhapsodic—and ecstatic—about the unexpected fusion of eastern and western pasta)


— inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers —




















— changed URL —



— that’s all for now —

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

How to Write a Great Book
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #227 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.


The Libro-Emporium

Doorstops and lavatory entertainments abound in our book store.