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Food Sites for February 2019

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Cassoulet... not pretty, but pretty good for a wintery night.

We suspect that you might be feeling a certain relief... now that the holiday season’s grande bouffe is behind us (alas, perhaps, literally—or steatopygously—behind us). Nonetheless, Roll Magazine has published some of our thoughts on holiday feasting. “Eating Our Way Through the Holidays” is served somewhat tongue-in-cheek... which means it is utterly devoid of fats and carbs.

Our next food book, Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier, is due from Rowman and Littlefield any day now. Maryann Tebben (author of Sauces: A Global History) was kind enough to write this blurb for the back cover: 

A truly comprehensive world tour of sauces, with recipes for every sauce you can imagine (and some you can’t). This book is a lively and engaging fresh take on what sauces are and how to define them, with scientific principles and a healthy dose of humor, a century after Escoffier.
We’re blushing... but we’ll take it anyway.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Some thoughts about a First World problem from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four... unless there are three other people. Orson Welles
Oh, pity the poor glutton
Whose troubles all begin
In struggling on and on to turn
What’s out into what’s in. Walter de la Mare
What feeds me destroys me. Christopher Marlowe
The optimist sees the doughnut but the pessimist see 452 calories and a shed load of sugar. James Minter
Let me have men about me that are fat... Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look. He thinks too much: such men are dangerous. William Shakespeare
Gary
February, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Jonell Galloway), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(James Edward Malin describes some of the difficulties that food scholars face in today’s libraries in an article in Graduate Association for Food Studies; it’s not about the absence of snacking opportunities)

(Mayukh Sen’s article, in Topic, on foods meant to soothe the souls of the bereaved)

(archive of articles from Gastro Obscura)

(Gael Greene, on becoming Gael Greene under the tyranny of New York’s haute cuisine, in her blog, Bite: My Journal)

(Marissa Nicosia on several versions of this medieval/winter favorite)

(Carys Bennett, Jan Zalasiewicz, Mark Williams, and Richard Thomas on chicken “evolution” for The Conversation)

(Robert Simonson debunks some fakelore for Punch)

(Ernie Smith writes, for Tedium, about the meat industry’s attempts to find more profitable ways to cut meat—making inexpensive parts of each animal more desirable)

(archived New York Times article, from February 4, 1895, on the city’s first meatless eatery)

(Matt and Ted Lee, at Garden&Gun, mourn the loss of some traditional southern foodstuffs)

(Mayukh Sen’s essay, in the Poetry Foundation magazine, on the cookbooks of Maya Angelou)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----








---- yet another blog ----



---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #220 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.


Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.

Food Sites for January 2019

Friday, December 14, 2018

Winter, a time to consider one’s roots (both metaphorical & culinary).

‘Tis winter, a time when writers are wont to curl up with a book—their own or someone else’s. Preferably, this is done in the company of a warming libation: coffee, tea, cocoa, or something stronger (‘though, unless one’s byline is Hemingway, “something stronger” is not recommended during the editing phase). Kenneth Rexroth, by the way, was fond of hot white wine,  infused with cardamom seeds. 

We’re scribbling away, nearly half-way through the first draft of a second novel (a book that has little or nothing to do with food). Since, we won’t start editing it for months, it might be prudent to discover where our jar of cardamom seeds is hiding.

Our next food book, Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier, is due from Rowman and Littlefield in January, and is already available for pre-order.



You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Have you noticed that certain holidays are always associated with heavy drinking? As New Year’s Eve is a notable example, here are few thoughts about the sauce (from an expert we lost this year). They’re the sort of thing you might expect to find at On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

Unlicensed hooch from a stranger in a parking lot. Good idea? Yes, of course it is. Anthony Bourdain
I need the anesthetic qualities of the local fire water. Anthony Bourdain
For their own good, vegetarians should never be allowed near fine beers and ales. It will only make them loud and belligerent, and they lack the physical strength and aggressive nature to back up any drunken assertions. Anthony Bourdain
I believe—to the best of my recollection, anyway—that I soon made the classic error of moving from margaritas to actual shots of straight tequila. It does make it easier to meet new people. Anthony Bourdain

Gary
January, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Scott Alves Barton), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Ligaya Mishan addresses complex issues of authenticity and otherness in The New York Times)

(the offal truth, from the blog Old European Culture)

(Jen Karetnick on why taste and smell aren’t everything in how we perceive food, for ABP: A Beautiful Perspective)

(Bruce Bower, in Science News, on archaeological evidence that vanilla did not—contrary to conventional wisdom—originate in Mexico)

(Saveur’s Jasmine P. Ting on one of the world’s most truly “fusion” cuisines)

(a visit to this Swedish destination might help you stay on your diet)

(Kristy Mucci’s Saveur pictorial guide)

(Gavin Markham’s article, in Locavore, in response to work done at the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark)

(Shaun Chavis interviews Ken Albala for How Stuff Works)

(beautifully illustrated exhibit from the University of Michigan’s Special Collections Library)

(Bryce Wiatrak’s take on this fortified wine, for Delectable)

(Kat Kinsman’s Food & Wine article about Irma Rombauer’s Joy of Cooking)

(Chloe Olewitz’s article, in Morsel, on the creation of the Wiki gallery of fruit art)

(Vittoria Traverso on foraging, Italian style, for Gastro Obscura)

(Lindsay Patterson on a recent experiment that studied how the bacterial ecology of bakers’ hands affects the breads they bake; on NPR’s The Salt)

(Ligaya Mishan, in The New York Times, on the work of “artists who play with their food”)

(Anatoly Liberman shows that even a very respectable blog—like that of the Oxford University Press—can’t always provide easy answers to what might seem to be simple questions)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----













---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #219 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.


Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.

Food Sites for December 2018

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Sage, in our sorry excuse for an herb garden.

The aroma of the first sage-stuffed roasted turkey of the season can warm the coldest heart...  if we can manage to dig some out of our snow-draped garden. Speaking of turkeys, Roll Magazine has reissued an article (“Thanksgiving”), on the off-chance that you might have forgotten there was such a holiday in the offing...

Modern Salt has published one of our memoirish angling sagas. The Great Texan Fish Massacre revisits the scene of an ancient crime. Our next book, Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier, is due from Rowman and Littlefield in January, but is already available for pre-order.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Before our new book comes out, a few thoughts about sauces from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

SAUCE, n. The one infallible sign of civilization and enlightenment. A people with no sauces has one thousand vices; a people with one sauce has only nine hundred and ninety-nine. For every sauce invented and accepted a vice is renounced and forgiven. Ambrose Bierce
Sauces are greatly admired by the British. ...we like our sauces to come to the table in the bottle so that in between examining the other guests we can read the labels and memorize the list of ingredients. Derek Cooper
A well made sauce will make even an elephant or a grandfather palatable. Grimod de la Reyniere
Gary
December, 2018

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Suzanne Fass and Dianne Jacob), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Bruce Bower, at Science News, on recent archaeological work near the upper Amazon)

(Heather Arndt Anderson interviewed Graham Kerr for Taste

(“recovering medievalist“ Karl Hagen’s researches into the fifteenth-century’s The Book of Margery Kemp)

(Gerhard P. Shipley and Kelly Kindscher, at Scientifica, on how we know what we know about the eating habits of some early ancestors)

(Mary Winston Nicklin, at Vinepair, on the fortified French wine, Banyuls)

(answers provided by Trevor Day, author of Sardine)

(Vinepair’s Cat Wolinski discusses on-going arguments in the brewing industry)

(Rachel Rummel, for Gastro Obscura, on a “health food” turned soda fountain staple)

(Hannah Roberts exposes—in the Financial Times’ FT Magazine Food & Drink—the ways organized crime is diverting farm subsidies, food processing, and markets all over Italy)

(Gastro Obscura’s Abbey Perreault on the manners and table habits of pre-fork Europe)

(Leila Ashtari, at Modern Farmer, on the state of heirloom corn in Mexico)

(Simran Sethi, in Smithsonian, on the nuances of chocolate flavor, as explained by cacao guru Darin Sukha)

(Abbey Perreault on the work of Andrea Gutiérrez, who has found that inscriptions of South Indian temples can tell us a lot about medieval foodways—mostly through described naivedya, food offerings; a Gastro Obscura article)

(Tim McKirdy explains how and why the sugar content of potential alcoholic beverages is measured; in Vinepair)

(Amie Tsang reports, in The New York Times, about a Dutch court’s ruling; spoiler alert: a flavor is not a copyrightable “expression of an original intellectual creation”)

(myrecipes answers several cheese-related questions, not just about plastic-robed chevre)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----










---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for Our Books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating

(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #218 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2018 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for November 2018

Saturday, October 13, 2018

Strutting at the Farmer’s Museum in Cooperstown, NY.

What a difference a month makes! Right now, with November just about to start, the prospect of a turkey dinner (with, as the expression goes, “all the fixins”) is a cascade of nostalgic and gustatory longing. By the first day of December, it’s a mind- and palate-numbing mass of leftovers that one can’t even give away—because everyone else’s refrigerator is stuffed with identically dead birds.

Speaking of leftovers... Roll Magazine has reprised an old article (that had been in print, but never online, before). “Creamsicles, Re-imagined” provided a couple of frosty treats just when summer began to disappear from memory. Jonell Galloway has published our article, “The History of Roquefort Dressing” at The Rambling Epicure.

Still waiting for responses to the first draft of our novel (Future Tense: The Remembrance of Things Not Yet Past). We suspect that there’s entirely too much gentility among our friends—consequently, they just can’t bear to hurt our feelings. They don’t realize that this affliction is not so easily thwarted. Our next novel (Cenotaphs) is already metastasizing at a dangerous pace.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

In order to get the jump on the impending post-prandial avian aversion, here are some leftovers from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

On Thanksgiving, you realize you’re living in a modern world. Millions of turkeys baste themselves in millions of ovens that clean themselves. George Carlin
Turkey: A large bird whose flesh, when eaten on certain religious anniversaries has the peculiar property of attesting piety and gratitude. Ambrose Bierce
What is sauce for the goose may be sauce for the gander, but it is not necessarily sauce for the chicken, the duck, the turkey or the Guinea hen. Alice B. Toklas
If the soup had been as warm as the wine, if the wine had been as old as the turkey, if the turkey had had a breast like the maid, it would have been a swell dinner. Duncan Hines
Gary
November, 2018

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Vic Leeds), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Gastro Obscura’s Paula Mejia rhapsodizes about medieval Islamic gastronomy as revealed in the Annals of the Caliphs’ Kitchens)

(Anne Ewbank writes about the ancestors of our all-night diners, for Gastro Obscura)

(spoiler alert: this is NOT your usual wine book—that’s why an article about it appears in Gastro Obscura)

(Abbey Perreault, at Gastro Obscura, on the Kanz al-Fawa’id Fi Tanwi’ al-Mawa’id, or Treasure Trove of Benefits and Variety at the Table)

(searchable database about drinking in England between 1580 and 1740)

(Sarah Baird’s homage at Roads & Kingdoms)

(Gastro Obscura’s Rachel Rummel serves a glass of a classic Slavic tipple)

(museum dedicated to one of the world’s greatest hams; in English and Italian)

(140 images from a California archive of decorative fruit-crate labels; 1885-1930s)

(Alexander Lee, in History Today, on the social and economic history of the quintessential Gallic stew)

(Markham Heid, at Medium, says the “vilification of bread isn’t supported by strong research”)

(Andrea Pavoni has edited this collection of examinations of taste—as a philosophical concept—for the University of Westminster Press; downloadable PDF)

(archaeologist Farrell Monaco digs into the cooking of the ancient lands surrounding the Mediterranean, “one dish at a time”)

(Aaron Goldfarb, at Punch, isn’t falling for the hype)

(Deborah Blum’s excerpt, at Literary Hub, of her book—The Poison Squad—about one nineteenth-century’s chemist’s fight against food adulteration)

(Maria Godoy, at NPR’s Food for Thought, on Krishnendu Ray’s recent work on ethnicity, The Other, and our expectations about authenticity and prices)


---- changed URLs ----




---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----








---- yet more blogs ----






---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 


Helping On the Table—without spending a dime of your own money on it—is as easy as pie

Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, first click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our bookswill earn a commission for this newsletter without adding a dime (or even a penny) to your bill.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating

(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #217 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2018 by Gary Allen.



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