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Food Sites for May 2019

Saturday, April 13, 2019

Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in spawning colors

Hope—as we’ve been led to believe—springs eternal, but the converse is also true: Spring hopes eternal. Every day brings dreams of elusive vernal fare: eager trout, and cooperative morels, and ramps nodding in soft breezes. If only hope was sufficient to serve them up! 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Some springy daydreams from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

In the vegetable world, there is nothing so innocent, so confiding in its expression, as the small green face of the freshly-shelled spring pea. William Wallace Irwin
Some fishes become extinct, but Herrings go on forever. Herrings spawn at all times and places and nothing will induce them to change their ways. They have no fish control. Herrings congregate in schools, where they learn nothing at all. They move in vast numbers in May and October. Herrings subsist upon Copepods and Copepods subsist upon Diatoms and Diatoms just float around and reproduce. Young Herrings or Sperling or Whitebait are rather cute. They have serrated abdomens. The skull of the Common or Coney Island Herring is triangular, but he would be just the same anyway. (The nervous system of the Herring is fairly simple. When the Herring runs into something the stimulus is flashed to the forebrain, with or without results.) Will Cuppy
What could be got from the woods was free and amounted to a diurnal dining diary that everyone kept in their heads. May was wild asparagus, arugula, and artichokes. Bill Buford
Gary
May, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to David M Rosenstein), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Reina Gattuso shows us, at GastroObscura, that ethnic cleansing is sometimes served in the cafeteria)

(over twenty articles on Chinese food from the University of Oregon)

(Marissa Nicosia, gelling in the Folger Library’s Shakespeare & Beyond)

(Elaine Castillo, at Taste, on one foreign influence on the food of The Philippines)

(Allison Aubrey, for NPR’s The Salt, on why some people are not eating their vegetables)

(Jennifer McGavin, at the Spruce Eats)

(Bethany Econopouly and Dr. Stephen Jones wrestle with legal and conceptual definitions for The Bread Lab)

(Rohini Chaki, at GastroObscura, on the prototypical example of cultural appropriation of the culinary variety)

(Irene Yoo, at Food52, on the role of Japanese occupation on a basic staple of the Korean diet)

(text of John Kirkland’s 1911 book; in The University of Leeds Library)

(Mike Pomerantz writes, in Food & Wine, on work done by Gordon Shepherd, author of Neuroenology: How the Brain Creates the Taste of Wine)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----












---- yet more blogs ----




---- changed URL ----



---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #223 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for April 2019

Saturday, March 16, 2019


Winter has only four days left as we write. Traces of Spring are beginning to appear, but it’s still cold enough for long slow-cooked meals. A pot of beans would do nicely—even if they’re dried (unlike the fresh cranberry beans above... the produce of a previous summer).

Winter is made for scribblers like us, if only because there are no soft breezes, hazy vistas, shy morels, or rising trout to distract us. We’re doing our best to make use of the time, adding chapters to one novel while editing another. Someday, we might even find a new subject for a food book...

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Some mixed opinions about the musical fruit from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

Abstain from beans. There be sundry interpretations of this symbol. But Plutarch and Cicero think beans to be forbidden of Pythagoras, because they be windy and do engender impure humours and for that cause provoke bodily lust. Richard Taverner
If pale beans bubble for you in a red earthenware pot, you can often decline the dinners of sumptuous hosts. Martial
I have no truck with lettuce, cabbage, and similar chlorophyll. Any dietitian will tell you that a running foot of apple strudel contains four times the vitamins of a bushel of beans. S.J. Perelman
Better beans and bacon in peace than cakes and ale in fear. Aesop
Gary
April, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Elatia Harris), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Megan Gannon reviews some recent Mycenaean archeology for Live Science)

(Devorah Emmet Wigoder, on “herbs and spices of the ancient Near East” for Bible History Daily)

(Patricia Gadsby and Eric Weeks, in Discover Magazine, on the influence of Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis on the flavor of San Francisco’s famous bread)

(Edith Zimmerman, in New York magazine, on experiencing capsaicin)

(archaeologists’ efforts to understand the dining habits of students and faculty in nineteenth century Michigan)

(Bruce Bower, at Science News, looks at what recent DNA research can tell us about the 9,000-year domestication of maize’s wild ancestor, teosinte)

(podcasts of the BBC Radio4 series)

(Wee Ling Soh’s article, in Roads & Kingdoms, on an archetypical fusion cuisine)

(Siddhartha Mukherjee, in The New York Times, on the dearth of knowledge about the intersection of nutrition and oncology)

(Matt Davis’s article, at Big Think, on the economics, ecology, and aesthetics of synthetic meat)

(Chip Walton interviews Jenny Linford—author of Missing Ingredient—for The Splendid Table)

(Melissa Kravitz discusses the linguistic and legal issues for Truthout)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----








---- yet another blog ----



---- changed URL ----



---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #222 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for March 2019

Saturday, February 16, 2019


Caffeine (C8H10N4O2): Brain Juice, Cupped Lighting, Go Juice, High Octane, Java, Jitter Juice, Joe, Liquid Energy, Morning Jolt, Rocket Fuel

Winter should be the most productive season for writing, but it doesn’t hurt to prime the pump, does it? Balzac, who managed to crank out a few words in his time, is said to have consumed some fifty cups a day. Granted, they were tiny cups... but even so, he must have had a hard time sitting still in his chair. He described the effect of his preferred stimulant:

… sparks shoot all the way up to the brain. From that moment on, everything becomes agitated. Ideas quick-march into motion like battalions of a grand army to its legendary fighting ground, and the battle rages. Memories charge in, bright flags on high; the cavalry of metaphor deploys with a magnificent gallop; the artillery of logic rushes up with clattering wagons and cartridges; on imagination’s orders, sharpshooters sight and fire; forms and shapes and characters rear up; the paper is spread with ink - for the nightly labor begins and ends with torrents of this black water, as a battle opens and concludes with black powder.

Haven’t seen any reviews of Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier, yet... but it was cited in a Wikipedia entry. Are any non-academics sufficiently nerdy to read footnotes... anywhere, let alone at Wikipedia? Also, do academics even read Wikipedia? So many trivial questions that distract one from one’s writing... probably need to pour another cup of coffee.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

More stimuli from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

A mathematician is a device for turning coffee into theorems. Paul Erdos
…counterfeit foods are common in times of scarcity: wartime ersatz coffee for example. Or carob for real chocolate, when there is a scarcity of common sense. Janet Clarkson

Gary
March, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to David M. Rosenstein), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(online texts from the Noreen Reale Falcone Library of Lemoyne University)

(thoughtful and artful recipes from a bacteriologist; plus some scientific insights)

(Gordon Edgar‘s account at Saveur)

(Jim Chevallier asserts that, while there were many good reasons for drinking beer in the Middle Ages, dread of impure water wasn’t one of them)

(according to At the Table’s Diana Henry, ”While you read a menu, time is suspended“)

(Emily Bell, at Vinepair, explains that cocktail creators weren’t always white hipsters)

(Lauren Cocking reports on the wild and crazy cocoa scene, for Gastro Obscura)

(botanical info on: almonds, apples, apricots, cherries, loquats, peaches, pears, pluots, and quinces)

(Julia Sherman develops a Taste for entomophagy)

(Anika Burgess’s illustrated visit to bizarre dishes at Gastro Obscura)

(Bess Connolly outlines some of the complications of recreating 4,000-year-old dishes for Yale News)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----

















---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Hardcover)
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #221 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for February 2019

Saturday, January 12, 2019

Cassoulet... not pretty, but pretty good for a wintery night.

We suspect that you might be feeling a certain relief... now that the holiday season’s grande bouffe is behind us (alas, perhaps, literally—or steatopygously—behind us). Nonetheless, Roll Magazine has published some of our thoughts on holiday feasting. “Eating Our Way Through the Holidays” is served somewhat tongue-in-cheek... which means it is utterly devoid of fats and carbs.

Our next food book, Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier, is due from Rowman and Littlefield any day now. Maryann Tebben (author of Sauces: A Global History) was kind enough to write this blurb for the back cover: 

A truly comprehensive world tour of sauces, with recipes for every sauce you can imagine (and some you can’t). This book is a lively and engaging fresh take on what sauces are and how to define them, with scientific principles and a healthy dose of humor, a century after Escoffier.
We’re blushing... but we’ll take it anyway.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook (where, among other things, we post a LOT of photographs), and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

Some thoughts about a First World problem from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four... unless there are three other people. Orson Welles
Oh, pity the poor glutton
Whose troubles all begin
In struggling on and on to turn
What’s out into what’s in. Walter de la Mare
What feeds me destroys me. Christopher Marlowe
The optimist sees the doughnut but the pessimist see 452 calories and a shed load of sugar. James Minter
Let me have men about me that are fat... Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look. He thinks too much: such men are dangerous. William Shakespeare
Gary
February, 2019

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out corrections or tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Jonell Galloway), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(James Edward Malin describes some of the difficulties that food scholars face in today’s libraries in an article in Graduate Association for Food Studies; it’s not about the absence of snacking opportunities)

(Mayukh Sen’s article, in Topic, on foods meant to soothe the souls of the bereaved)

(archive of articles from Gastro Obscura)

(Gael Greene, on becoming Gael Greene under the tyranny of New York’s haute cuisine, in her blog, Bite: My Journal)

(Marissa Nicosia on several versions of this medieval/winter favorite)

(Carys Bennett, Jan Zalasiewicz, Mark Williams, and Richard Thomas on chicken “evolution” for The Conversation)

(Robert Simonson debunks some fakelore for Punch)

(Ernie Smith writes, for Tedium, about the meat industry’s attempts to find more profitable ways to cut meat—making inexpensive parts of each animal more desirable)

(archived New York Times article, from February 4, 1895, on the city’s first meatless eatery)

(Matt and Ted Lee, at Garden&Gun, mourn the loss of some traditional southern foodstuffs)

(Mayukh Sen’s essay, in the Poetry Foundation magazine, on the cookbooks of Maya Angelou)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful or amusing) sites for writers/bloggers ----








---- yet another blog ----



---- that’s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs for our books:

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(newsletters like this merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sauces Reconsidered: Aprés Escoffier

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man:
On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #220 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author’s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.


Copyright ©2019 by Gary Allen.

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Doorstops and lavatory entertainments abound in our book store.