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Food Sites for May 2018

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Crab tracks on a St. Augustine sand dune.

Spring is a time of rampant expectations, tantalizingly close, yet not quite there... until they gloriously explode into full bloom everywhere. The season for crabs, and morels, and ramps is almost here... and we’re more than ready for them. It’s been an absurdly long winter, and we’re not going to mourn one slushy minute of it.

Anxiously waiting for edits to our new book—Après Escoffier: Sauces Reconsidered—to arrive, and we’re eager to get on with transforming it from a not-entirely-rough draft to something someone might want to read.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

A scribbler’s quote (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) this month:

God have mercy on the sinner 
Who must write with no dinner, 
No gravy and no grub, 
No pewter and no pub, 
No belly and no bowels, 
Only consonants and vowels. John Crowe Ransom
Gary
May, 2018

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Cara De Silva), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We‘re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Julia Ioffe rediscovers Russia’s lost culinary heritage for The New Yorker)

(Zoë Björnson, on the Americanization of this classic British cheese, at Eat Sip Trip)

(Anne Ewbank’s profile of chef-artist Takehiro Kishimoto, for Atlas Obscura)

(Monte Mathews’ food and travel site)

(downloadable e-books from the rare book collections of The Florida State University Libraries)

(Valerie Stivers recreates some dishes from The Three Musketeers for The Paris Review)

(Danielle Beurteaux, at Civil Eats, on experiments in upcycling in Drexel University’s Food Lab)

(Linda Pelaccio’s interview with author Annie Gray, podcast on Heritage Radio)

(Kieran Morris write about “ the most inventive chef in history“ in The Guardian)

(Anny Gaul looks at the dip’s fourteenth-century origins, for The Recipe Project)

(Heather Wiseman’s article about chef Peter Morgan-Jones inspires questions about the nature of eating)

(“…a nonprofit educational and cultural organization dedicated to the discovery, understanding and celebration of food, drink and its related culture and folklife in America and the world”)

(a history of the second-oldest kitchen utensil, from Ana Kinkaid at We Are Chefs)

(Dwight Furrows mulls over Tex-Mex at Edible Arts)

(“production process and history of baking systems,” by Antonella Pasqualone, for Science Direct)

(Craig Hlavaty’s annotated slideshow for The New Haven Register)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----







---- yet more blogs ----





---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #211 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2018 by Gary Allen.



Food Sites for April 2018

Friday, March 16, 2018


As this is being written, maple sugaring season is winding down, and we’re already thinking about morels... far too soon, but such is the nature of Winter’s effects on our mental processes.

However, Winter is writing season (like every other season in our house), so while waiting for edits to our new book—Après Escoffier: Sauces Reconsidered—to arrive, we keep scribbling away on our novel-in-progress. Meantime, Roll Magazine has seen fit to publish another of our old pieces: “A Wine Epiphany on the Cheap.” Also, at Just Served, there’s a little bit of non-food writing this month. A Chimp Off the Old Block recounts some of the darker sides of good dental care.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) reveal our longing for a change of seasons:

Live in each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influence of each. Grow green with the spring, yellow and ripe with autumn. Henry David Thoreau 
In the vegetable world, there is nothing so innocent, so confiding in its expression, as the small green face of the freshly-shelled spring pea. William Wallace Irwin
Palpating, crackling, splitting on the grill, Boudins whistle louder than blackbirds in April. Paul Harel
Gary
April, 2018

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out tasty sites (this month we’re tipping our hat to Nancy Harmon Jenkins), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(“...recipes that are related to Jewish History during the Biblical, Greek and Roman periods”)

(Xanthe Clay slathers it on, at the UK’s National Geographic Food)

(Brian Yarvin spills the beans at The Rambling Epicure)

(Farah Yameen, in The Hindu Business Line, on some of the roots of Indian cuisine)

(the Manhattan Users Guide has posted a few recipes that were New Yorker’s favorites, back in 1939)

(Kim Severson, in The New York Times, on a recently discovered form of rice, in Trinidad, a gift from Thomas Jefferson)

(“flour components,” by Bethany Moncel, at The Spruce)

(Gastro Obscura’s Samantha Snively on how natural history informed the culinary amusements created by Hannah Woolley, Margaret Cavendish, and others)

(Julie Creswell, in The New York Times, on the legal battles over a seemingly simple word)

(“Greek food and Beyond,” from cookbook author Peter Minaki)

(Gabe Ulla, in Saveur, serves up Cortney Burns’s recommendations for new fermenters)

(just desserts, state by state, by Nancie McDermott, at Southern Living)

(a tasting menu of concepts covered in her book, Why You Eat What You Eat)

(Jason Kottke almost makes one stop ordering lobsters)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----



---- yet another blog ----






---- and, not specifically about food, but... ----



---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #210 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2018 by Gary Allen.



A Chimp Off the Old Block

Friday, March 2, 2018

Just lying back in the dentist’s barcalounger, listening to music I would never choose on my own, waiting for the novocaine to kick in. The assistant spreads out an arsenal of medieval-looking weapons, while making the sort of small talk meant to relax me before “The Procedure.”

The Procedure, this time, is the removal of an old crown, in order to prepare me for the placement of a new crown, and the subsequent removal of a certain quantity of funds from my checking account. A substantial quantity of funds, but I’ve already braced myself for that particular pain. I have not prepared myself the unknown quantity of physical pain I might experience.

My lips and tongue couldn’t be less responsive if they belonged to someone else. The dentist suggests that I rinse, giving me a chance to demonstrate absolutely zero control of my mouth. Liquids of various descriptions dribble out in all directions… or, at least, in every direction except that of the tiny sink at my left elbow.

In a voice that I hope sounds casual, I ask how difficult it will be to remove a crown that has been cemented firmly in place for two decades. “It’s usually pretty simple. Since there’s a cavity under one edge, it should break loose almost on its own. I’ll cut the crown in half to make it easier to pry off the rest.” That’s pretty reassuring.

He starts sawing through the porcelain. It takes a long time, and my jaw aches from being stretched to its maximum opening. “The porcelain cuts pretty easily,” he says, “the metal underneath is considerably tougher.” I find that considerably less reassuring.

He switches to a different tool, saying that—one time—he went through a dozen #34 tips on one crown. I have a sinking suspicion that he knows that I am no longer in a position to object to anything he wants to do to me. The sawing continues. He stops and tries to pry off a bit of the old crown.

It doesn’t work.

The sawing continues, going back and forth between the tools used for porcelain and the now infamous #34s. He says that he’s had to saw the old crown in eighths. He resumes the prying maneuvers.

It still doesn’t work.

He asks the assistant for “the tapper.”

“The tapper” sounds so much better than “the hammer.” But it is a hammer. It’s accompanied by “the chisel.” For the next half hour, my hyper-extended jaw is twisted sideways from repeated blows. At one point he asks me to keep my eyes closed, because a flying chip of my former crown has landed just below my left eyelid. I’m happy to comply, because—for a moment—I can relax my over-stretched mandibular muscles.

Finally the crown, reduced to a small pile of shrapnel among the dental tools, is no more.

It’s not the conclusion of The Procedure, however. More tools descend into my gaping maw, grinding and scraping, chipping away at whatever had been lurking beneath the old prosthesis. At this point, they insert various devices and substances in order to make molds to be used to manufacture a replacement crown. This means several grateful minutes when my mouth gets to remain closed.


I wonder if novocaine is responsible for this surge of euphoria, or if it’s just relief subsequent to The Procedure, but I start to feel good. It was the result of neither. I am soothed by the attentions of a couple of members of my own species fussing over me. I am just another primate, an oversized chimp as it were, blissfully having my fur groomed by the rest of his troop.

Of course a chimp doesn't have to pay over a thousand dollars for a bit of sociable lice-picking. So who’s the smarter primate?  

Food Sites for March 2018

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

A Couple of  Winter Vegetables: 
Beets and turnips, certainly... but where are the carrots, parsnips, and sweet potatoes?


Well... we (at least those of us in the more blighted parts of the northern hemisphere) have made it through the first half of winter. We’re relieved to see that the days are getting longer, but we still crave the comfort of roasted foods—foods that warm both home and the heart.

Having completed the first, second and third drafts our new book (Après Escoffier: Sauces Reconsidered), it’s been submitted to Ken Albala, the food book series editor at Rowan and Littlefield. Which means—until the book comes back for final edits & corrections—there’s some breathing space to devote to a novel-in-progress.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quote (not, this time, from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) offers a bit of wintry commiseration. Feel free to sing along with Ezra Pound’s “Ancient Music”:

Winter is icummen in, 
Lhude sing Goddamm, 
Raineth drop and staineth slop, 
And how the wind doth ramm!   
         Sing: Goddamm
Skiddeth bus and sloppeth us, 
An ague hath my ham. 
Freezeth river, turneth liver,         
        Damn you, sing: Goddamm.
Goddamm, Goddamm, ‘tis why I am, Goddamm,
           So, gainst the winter’s balm. 
Sing goddamm, damn, sing goddamm, 
Sing goddamm, sing goddamm, DAMM. 
Gary
March, 2018

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out tasty sites (we're looking at you, Jonell Galloway), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Maywa Montenegro, at Gastronomica, reminds us of the biological value of genetic diversity for agriculture in a world challenged by climate change)

(how, and why, we should consider biting back)

(Natalie Jacewicz surveys the tables of the past for NPR’s The Salt)

(Annalee Newitz, in ars technica, on archaeobotanist Natalie Mueller’s search for native species of lost crops)

(Rachel Sugar, at Taste, purges some notions about Russian foods—many of which survived the Soviet Era)

(Dwight Furrow, thinking about how we think about food and wine, at Edible Arts)

(Tricia Cohen sails beyond Captains Jack and Jack Sparrow, at ThymeMachine)

(Jessica Leigh Hester, at Atlas Obscura, on efforts to use experimental archaeology to learn about the foods of the past)

(Bill Broadbent is doing his best to spread the gospel of entomophagy)

(Joe Pinsker surveys many of the essential books that reveal the essentials of cooking, for Atlantic)

(Simran Sethi, at The New Food Economy, looks at the history and science behind all sides of this contentious subject)

(Dwight Furrow shares the principles at Edible Arts)



---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----







---- yet another blog ----



---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #209 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2018 by Gary Allen.



Food Sites for February 2018

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Unqualified Climactic Prognosticator: Marmota monax


The groundhog in the mugshot, above, spends his summers eye-balling (or worse) our garden. He’s sleeping soundly at the moment, no doubt dreaming of vegetarian feasts past and future. Very soon, one of his distant relatives will be dragged, protesting, into what we hope will be a darkly overcast Punxsatawney morning. The calendar may claim that Winter only lasts for three months, but it already feels like we’re a year or so into this one. 

We’ll just have to keep digging out—outside—and digging in, inside. We’ve completed the first and second drafts our new book (Après Escoffier: Sauces Reconsidered), and are still deep in the editing process—while making notes in our novel-in-progress. Basically, we’ve done little beside shoveling and scribbling. This self-aggrandising news, BTW, is our puny attempt at apologizing for the shortened issue this month.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection offer some lightly literary respite from winter.

The Highlanders regale themselves with whisky. They find it an excellent preservation against the winter cold. It is given with great success to the infants in the confluent smallpox. Tobias Smollett
I know the look of an apple that is roasting and sizzling on the hearth on a winter’s evening, and I know the comfort that comes of eating it hot, along with some sugar and a drench of cream... I know how the nuts taken in conjunction with winter apples, cider, and doughnuts, make old people’s tales and old jokes sound fresh and crisp and enchanting. Mark Twain
Gary
February, 2018

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out tasty sites (like Awanthi Vardaraj), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(“...an artist-led think tank that examines the biotechnologies and biodiversity of human food systems” that works together “with scientists, chefs, hackers and farmers“)

(Nadia Berenstein’s article, at Aeon, about Henry Theophilus Finck’s “programme for the mass-production of deliciousness”)

(Online international travel magazine’s offerings of food writing)

(Siddhartha Mitter’s essay, in Oxford American, on race, slime, and vegetal conflict)

(Zahra Hankir waxes nostalgic, and historical, on the roots of some classic Lebanese dishes)

(Dwight Furrow muses, philosophically and scientifically, on the ultimate nature of wine; at 3 Quarks Daily)

---- changed URL ----



---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----







---- yet more blogs ----








---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #208 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2018 by Gary Allen.



The Libro-Emporium

Doorstops and lavatory entertainments abound in our book store.