Subscribe

Through the wonders of modern telegraphy, you may now receive updates from this site in your electro-mailbox. Simply enter your email address below:


Or subscribe via RSS.

Archives

Foodsites for February 2015

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Right now, it might feel about as far from Spring as can be imagined, but we’re about to put all of our faith in the prognostications of rodent in Pennsylvania. 


February, an otherwise dismal month, attempts to be relieved by several holidays.

In the US we have President’s Day (which used to be two holidays, until the powers-that-be decided that two holidays constituted entirely too much fun). As a child I remember that Washington’s Birthday was always celebrated with a homemade cherry pie, but today it just seems to be an excuse for sales of all sorts of items we don’t actually need.

The other two holidays (the ones that don’t provide days off) celebrate—appropriately enough—possibly unrequited longing: Valentine’s Day and Groundhog Day. The folks who invented the calendar must have realized how depressing February can be—otherwise, why would they have made it the shortest month?

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served, directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. 


You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner

In honor of Groundhog Day (when, each year, we substitute desperate hope for bitter experience), we’ll extract something about Marmota monax from On the Table’s culinary quote collection


As I came home through the woods with my string of fish, trailing my pole, it being now quite dark, I caught a glimpse of a woodchuck stealing across my path, and felt a strange thrill of savage delight, and was strongly tempted to seize and devour him raw; not that I was hungry then, except for that wildness which he represented. Henry David Thoreau

Gary
February 2015

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed (as has my virtual friend, Karen Resta)—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites—thanks, and keep them coming!


PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

American Menu, The
(historic musings from menu collector Henry B. Voigt)

Behind the Recipe -- Jeri Quinzio
(food history from the author of Of Sugar and Snow: A History of Ice Cream Making)

Books, Food & History 
(site of the University of Amsterdam’s Special Collection on the History of Food)

Brief History of the French Baguette, A
(the classic French loaf is not as ancient as we might think…)

Cook in Colonial Africa, A
(Cynthia Bertelsen, on what it was like for tropical cooks to prepare typical British meals)

Cookbook of Unknown Ladies, The
(“Curious recipes and hidden histories from Westminster City Archives”)

Eat Your History: A Shared Table
(food history from down under)

Forgotten Cuisines of America
(Robert Sietsema’s exploration of the eclectic roots of American food, in Gourmet
Part 1: The Barrier Islands of South Carolina
Part 2: The Hmong
Part 3: Silicon Valley
Part 4: Tex-Mex
Part 5: Tex-Mex
Part 6: German-American)

Historic Cooking School
(Rena Goff on cookbooks—with many links to free e-versions, historic kitchens, and food museums)

Historic Foodie, The
(site of Martin & Victoria Rumble; foodwriting, bookselling, and historic recreating in the Appalachians)

Homo Gastronomicus
(thinking about eating, mostly British eating)

How Coffee Fueled the Civil War
(not your typical war story; from War History Online)

How I Became a Food Historian 
(Rachel Laudan tells all…)

Hushpuppy Nation 
(American food, southern style)

La Cocina Histórica
(exploring the collection of Mexican cookbooks at The University of Texas at San Antonio)

On Food and History 
(Lynn Nelson on food news, historic cookbooks, films that feature food, and suchlike tasty topics)

On MSG and Chinese Restaurant Syndrome
(Harold McGee puts another food fallacy to rest)

On the Idea of Novelty in Cuisine: A Brief Historical Insight 
(Bénédict Beaugé, in the International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science)

Short History of the Dining Room, A (Part 1)
(Christine Baumgarthuber’s article in The New Inquiry)

Tiny Bubbles: Where Food Met Science, Medicine, and Religion
(Rachel Laudan effervesces about the mostly Western fascination with aerated food and drink)

Why Black Eyed Peas? Why Greens?
(Michael W. Twitty on some southern staple foods; at Afroculinaria)

Why the Kitchen Computing Dream of the 80s Never Caught On
(Maureen Ryan on a bit of techie nostalgia for something that never really happened)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----

Amazon Is Not the Reader’s Friend, Says Debate Audience

Confusion Among Bloggers on Disclosing Compensation

Has Your Content Been Stolen? A Lawyer’s Guide To Defending Your Online Content

Mark Strand: Living Gorgeously

Questions from a Recipe Copy Editor

What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades


---- yet another blog ----

Opusculum


---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper), (Kindle)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover), (Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover), (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper), (Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover), (Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #172 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





Food Sites for January 2015

Thursday, December 25, 2014

Not what it looks like outside our door right now… 
but it’s only a matter of time.


January is named for the Roman god of doorways, and has two faces—one for looking forward and one for looking back. Janus seems quite appropriate for those of us who write about food, especially food historians. We’re always trying new things, but thinking about them in the context of the past. On the other hand, for those of us who have also raised children, the Roman god Edusa might deserve some supplication. She was responsible for getting the young ones to eat their veggies (and anything else they might reject untasted).

Despite the fact that feasting might have lost some of its appeal after all our holiday meals, this issue is—once again—over-stuffed. If it’s any consolation, the updates newsletters are always 100% calorie, cholesterol, gluten, and trans-fat free.

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served, directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. 

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

It’s a media tradition—around this time—to revisit major events of the past year. Bowing to peer pressure, On the Table’s culinary quote collection serves up it’s own leftover dish:

I was trying new green vegetables on my dog, Mabon. So, with all this talk that you could hardly survive without eating kale three times a day, I decided to try a little bit. I stir-fried it and put three little clumps in his dish. And he sniffed each clump, picked each one up and put it over there, and there, and there—and walked away. I was proud of him. Good boy! Judith Jones

Gary
January 2015


PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed (as has my friend Cynthia Bertelsen)—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites—thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

American Food History Project, The
(a series of exhibits at the Smithsonian; podcasts and videos)

Beyond Casserole: Mapping Out The Countrys Funeral Food Traditions
(regional variations on preferred comfort[ing] foods)

Bibliography of Sub-Saharan African Cookery Books
(link to downloadable Word document)

Boiling Fish
(Leanne Ogasawara on scent, memory, Marseilles, and the making of bouillabaisse; in 3 Quarks Daily)

Bread in the Middle Ages
(history, and a couple of recipes)

California Taco Trail, The: How Mexican Food Conquered America
(Carolina Miranda’s report on NPR)

Cara De Silva
(website of one very busy food journalist/historian/public speaker/editor/teacher)

Chef Leticia
(website & blog of expatriate Brazilian chef and cookbook author, Leticia Moreinos Schwartz)

Dobby’s Signature
(recipes from Nigeria)

Feats of Clay: The Role of the Qvevri in Georgian Winemaking
(Doug Wregg’s article about a traditional method of fermenting wine—in the Caucasus, where wine was first made—but is not at all like wine production anywhere else)

Food Borne Illness Prevention
(comprehensive list of links to pathogens and their medical implications, as well as federal and local regulations and standards for controlling them)

Graduate Association for Food Studies, The
(from Boston University’s Gastronomy Program and Harvard University, with far-flung faculty advisors from across the spectrum of food scholarship)

Grape Collective
(wine magazine)

History Cook, The: Food of Christmas Past
(a day in the kitchen with Ivan Day)

Human Ancestors Were Consuming Alcohol 10 Million Years Ago
(Carl Engelking, on genetic clues about our ability to metabolize booze, in Discover)

Hungry African, A
(African recipe site)

Italian Deli Meats
(“a journey through flavor, renewed nutritional quality and health benefits of a symbol of Italian culinary art;” PDF)

Meat Fermentation at the Crossroads of Innovation and Tradition: A Historical Outlook
(report by Frédéric Leroy, Anneke Geyzen, Maarten Janssens, Luc De Vuyst, and Peter Scholliers in Trends in Food Science & Technology)

Mzansi Style Cuisine
(modern South African recipes)

PAXIMADIA: Barley Biscuits Past and Present
(a traditional food of Crete)

Preserving Tradition: Appalachian Food Storybank Collects Tales of Mountain Meals
(“…a project of the Heritage Food Committee of Slow Foods Asheville,” North Carolina)

Roosevelt Family Built a New York Coffee Chain 50 Years Before Starbucks, The
(Jancee Dunn’s article in the Smithsonian Magazine)

Shrooming in Late Capitalism: The Way of the Truffle
(a personal account, and some history, of Tuber melanosporum & magnatum – with a soupcon of lesser-known truffle genera: Terfezia & Tirmania)

Special Sauce for Measuring Food Trends: The Fried Calamari Index
(Neil Irwin on the way certain foods rise from obscurity to cult status, then become so familiar that they are no longer mentioned in The New York Times)

Suzy Homemaker, a Slice of Life from the 1960s
(Judith Gradwohl’s article, on a Smithsonian exhibit that uses a domestic toy to revisit a turbulent moment in our domestic history)

Taste of Tanzania
(Miriam Kinunda’s site about Swahili food and culture)

Viennese Delights: Remarks on the History of Food and Sociability in Eighteenth-Century Central Europe
(David Do Paço’s paper, published as part of the Max Weber Programme  of the European University Institute)

Visit to the Kitchen of Legendary Cookbook Editor Judith Jones, A
(Charlotte Druckman’s article in The Wall Street Journal)

Why Kant Was Wrong About Food
(Dwight Furrow provides philosophical justification for our intellectual fascination with the things we stuff in our mouths)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----

Caught Between Gefilte Fish and Campbell’s Soup

Self-Publishing is Self-Correcting

Working for Free Has Value at Each Stage of a Career


---- yet more blogs ----

Adventures in Bread Making

Amuse-Bouches, Intermèdes et Mignardises

Chef Afrik

Come. Con. Ella.

Daily Dish

Emiko Davies

Food Lover’s Feast, A

foodgeekology

It Takes a Kitchen

Life in the Food Lane

My Darling Lemon Thyme

My Mission: Tastes of SF

Salad for President

Science and Food 


---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.


The Resource Guide for Food Writers


The Herbalist in the Kitchen


The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries


Human Cuisine


Herbs: A Global History


Terms of Vegery


How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating




Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #171 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author'‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2015 by Gary Allen.





A Huck Finn Moment, Recalled

Sunday, December 14, 2014

I first met Pete Seeger at Whiz Bang Quick City II (a four-day experimental architecture event held outside of Phoenicia, NY) in 1972. At the time, I was part of Big Foot Foam, a small team of folks using sprayed urethane foam to build energy-efficient homes. 
Pete was intrigued by the tiny floating foam shelter I had made, on the spot, in which I slept—mid-pond—on that long weekend. He told me that he had an idea for a vessel that could travel up and down the Hudson using no power other than its currents and tides. Sailors would simply go with the flow, while it was moved in their desired direction, and drop anchor when it did not. He said it could be built like a large raft, using discarded oil drums filled with urethane foam.



Top left: My small frog-like home-from-home, migrating to the pond.


Pete was so charmingly free of technological savvy that I didn’t have the heart to tell him about the environmental hazards of the petrochemicals used to make urethane foam, nor that the used oil drums would work perfectly well for his raft—all by themselves.


References to Whiz Bang Quick City II 
A Temporary City Celebrates Cooperation and Creativity. Mother Earth News, July/August 1972.

O’Corozine, Rich. “Off the Map.” Home Hudson Valley, May 14, 2012.

Flashback

Sunday, November 16, 2014

Some forty-five years ago, I—along with some five hundred thousand of my closest friends—attended a remarkable party on a farm in New York’s Sullivan County. Some time later, in reminiscing about that momentous blow-out, I wrote the following account:



By the Time I got to Woodstock
On the first of “four days of peace, love and music,” we packed ourselves into a Dodge Dart and drove from New Paltz to Bethel. OK, somewhere near Bethel—we got to within nine miles of the festival. After an immobile hour or two, my Dart-borne companions were ready to turn back.
Not about to miss this historical event, I climbed out, hoisted a sleeping bag onto my shoulder, and started walking past the endless line of stopped cars. After walking forever in the August heat—when I was perhaps half-way to the festival site—heaven smiled on this weary traveler. It began to rain—no mere sprinkle, but a hippie-soaking downpour.
Imagine the scene: thousands upon thousands of wet, tired, hippies (many with wet tired dogs) along a twenty-mile-long parking lot. Somewhere in the middle of this fragrant jamboree, a tall skinny guy, wearing white bellbottoms, a shiny purple rayon shirt (with puffy sleeves—good lord, what was I thinking?), trudged along, somewhat stooped under the weight of a water-logged sleeping bag.
Did this pony-tailed guy give up? No freakin’ way!
Not then, at least—the next morning was a different story.
I had spent the night cuddling up, beside someone I should never have been with, in that very wet sleeping bag. Did I mention that it was lined with some cheesy yellow-dyed flannel—and that, at the first sign of moisture, it released that yellow dye all over the enclosed hippies? Did I mention that the sleeping bag was, itself, half submerged in the re-hydrated fecal matter of generations of Max Yasgur’s dairy cows?
Enough was enough. I shuffled back down that same highway, and—when I reached some traffic that was moving—hitched a ride to New Paltz.
The white bell-bottoms—stained by god-knows-what-all was living in the mud of peace, love and music—were never white again.  No amount of bleach was to have any effect on them. I had to dye them a nearly fluorescent shade of magenta.
What can I say—It was 1969, and it seemed like a good thing to do at the time.




This week-end, I revisited the site of those events. The times they’ve been a-changing there. The long dirt road from the highway to Max Yasgur’s farm has grown into a paved two-lane road. A fancy museum and performance space now perches atop the hill. Inside, a gift shop overflows with peace, love, and trinkets—both cheap and not-so-cheap.




The museum’s exhibits did a great job of putting the weekend’s events in historical perspective—but that, of course, is one of the things that museums are supposed to do. They attempt to contextualize a collection of images and objects in order to help us imagine what it was like to be among them when they were current.

Unfortunately, museums can never really succeed because the moments they try to describe were filled with countless other things and sensations: things that are uncollectable, sensations that were taken for granted in the moment, but distinguish actual life from dioramas. No doubt, all historical museums are up against similar problems in trying to recreate the je ne sai quoi of temps perdu.

Certainly, the Museum at Bethel Woods showed ample photos and film of healthy young people joyously frolicking in mud… but do museum-goers smell that mud? Do they feel it oozing between their toes? Do they feel the grit of drying mud—in their hair, their ears, their very eyelashes—upon waking, before they even realize where they are? Can it help them to envision being deeply uncomfortable, but simultaneously oblivious to their discomforts because they were trivial compared the bizarre joy of rising amidst half a million equally uncomfortable but ecstatic friends? Do the photos capture the profound funkiness of half a million unwashed and mostly unwashable bodies, bodies that were more closely packed than in any time in human history? Might there have been a moment, onstage, when Ravi Shankar said to himself, “Odd… this smells a bit like the India I tried to leave behind when I came to the West?”

Revisiting that oh-so-clean homage to a moment in our history, with its glass cases filled with sanctified detritus of half-century-old everyday hippie life, and carefully re-created versions of things that were abandoned ages ago, I am reminded that, while we might—occasionally—find a spot where we were once, nothing about the spot will be the same. That the moments we remember, or even imagine we remember, are not what we believe them to have been. Inexplicably, words from a Kenneth Rexroth poem—in which he envisioned an amorous moment shared by Antony and Cleopatra—form in my head:

…taking off
 Their clothes of lace and velvet 
 And gold brocade and climbing
 Naked into bed together
 Lice in their stinking perfumed
 Armpits, the bed full of bugs.
_________________

On the way home, we stopped at a nearby restaurant, where our twenty-something waitress asked us if we had been to the festival. When I answered in the affirmative, she followed with, “Do you remember anything?”

Now I don’t know, for a fact, that her question implied a suspicion of illicit activities at the festival. Perhaps she merely assumed that I was suffering from senile dementia. Either way, it was a damned good question.

Food Sites for December 2014

Friday, November 14, 2014

A wintry feast of apples for wildlife—in one of the many orchards near New Paltz, New York.


With December, residents of the northern hemisphere enter winter. It’s the season for rich desserts and hearty foods, slow-cooked dishes that ooze calories and luscious saturated fats and make us forget there will ever be a time when we might consider wearing something more revealing than a down parka. 

Self-deception can be glorious when served in over-sized portions.

Speaking of over-sized portions, this issue is simply bursting its buttons with tasty new sites for those of us who cogitate (and/or pontificate) about all things gastronomical. Think of it as an extended cocktail hour preparing you for the holiday feasts to come (or a last chance to kick back and relax before the frenzy of festivities consumes us all).

Regular subscribers to our updates newsletter receive these updates from our blog, Just Served, directly—but there is much more at the blog that isn’t delivered automatically. In honor of the dinner party season, last month it served up “Too Hungry for Dinner at Hate.” November also saw Dr Sanscravat’s annual Thanksgiving ravings. This time, however, hiding behind the alias “I Am Curious: Orange,” it showed up in Roll Magazine.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter.  Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner

As usual, we assume that too much is never enough, so this month’s issue is piling on additional comments appropriate to the gorging season (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection):

Strange to see how a good dinner and feasting reconciles everybody. Samuel Pepys 
FEAST, n. A festival. A religious celebration usually signalized by gluttony and drunkenness, frequently in honor of some holy person distinguished for abstemiousness. Ambrose Bierce 
Contemporary societies have lost the sense of the feast but have kept the obscure drive for it. Umberto Eco
Gary
December, 2014



PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs -- or know of wonderful sites weve missed (as has my friend Cynthia Bertelsen) -- please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have suggested sites -- thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or -- if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues -- you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.



---- the new sites ----

aashpaz
(“a history of Persian food through the ages”)

Afternoon with M.F.K. Fisher, An
(Paul Levy’s article in The Wall Street Journal)

Amazing Ribs.com
(“the science of barbecue, grilling, and outdoor cooking”)

Apples
(Anna Lovett-Brown on the history and mythology of Malus pumila)

Ben Franklin’s List of 200 Synonyms for “Drunk”: “Moon-Ey’d,” “Hammerish,” “Stew’d” & More (1737) 
(not necessarily more useful than a thesaurus, but definitely more entertaining)

Bread of Affliction, The
(Lindsay Eanet, in McSweeney’s Monthly, on sandwiches)

Community of Lush: Wine, Alcohol, and the Social Bond, The
(Dwight Furrow on what goes on at wine tastings)

Fake-Tongue Illusion, The
(Nicola Twilley on how the perception of foods is altered by our expectations; in the New Yorker)

Food
(blog, recipes, and archive of food programming on PBS – for those outside of the US, that’s our Public Broadcasting Service)

Food and Drink
(food-themed articles selected from Aeon magazine)

Food & Gastronomy: Media and Writing
(eclectic site of Dr. Len Fisher, who studies food, biophysics, and nano-engineering—not necessarily in that order)

Food Stories from Gascony
(southwestern France described by photographer Tim Clinch and writer Kate Hill)

Green Revolution: Curse or Blessing?
(report by Peter B.R. Hazell, posted by the International Food Policy Research Institute)

Happy Apicius
(articles on food and culture from the Bibliothèque Municipale de Dijon; in French)

Image Gallery: Supper Clubs
(Jan Whitaker recalls more restaurants – swanky or not – but mostly perdu)

In Vitro Meat Cookbook, The: Recipes as Design Fiction
(an artistic and philosophical discussion of meat that doesn’t come from animals; a review of a whimsically and graphically lovely book)

Interview with Dwight Furrow, An
(the philosopher talks about his reasons for thinking about food)

Little Food History, A
(Nanna Rögnvaldardóttir on the food of Iceland)

Nietzsche’s Angel Food Cake 
(Rebecca Coffey’s deliciously deicidal recipe, in McSweeney’s)

Pen & Fork
(recipes, cookbook reviews, tips, links)

Shut Up and Eat: A Foodie Repents
(New Yorker article by John Lanchester, author of The Debt to Pleasure)

Symposion Journal
(“...a website devoted to things cultural, aesthetic and intellectual about food”)

Weiser Kitchen, The
(Tami Ganeles-Weiser – anthropologist and chef – creates modern variations on dishes from around the world in her Kosher kitchen)

What’s the Most Ethical Way to Eat Snack Mix?
(Dan Pashman allows several philosophers to weigh in on this... ummm... weighty question)

Why Civilization Rests on that Roast
(Dwight Furrow -- a professor of philosophy who often writes about food and wine, ethics, political philosophy, and aesthetics -- considers the social meanings of food)

Yesterdish: Rescuing America’s Lost Recipes
(a project that salvages old family recipes, often from spattered index cards, and often comparing them with contemporaneous published recipes)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----

Amazons Crowdsourced Publishing Venture Kindle Scout Goes Live

Back of the House: Writing this Blog

Editing Checklist For Writers, An

Ethical Author

Leave Me Alone

Looking for Inspiration? Open Your Eyes…and Get to Work 

Merriam-Webster Apps

On All the Ways to Write a Recipe

Passive Resistance

Platforms Are Overrated

SelfControl

Smashwords


---- yet more blogs ----

5 Second Rule

Cooking in the Archives

Coorg Table, The

Culinaria

Culinary Bro-down

Cultured Grub

Eat. Drink. Think.

Elizabeth Minchilli in Rome

Foraging & Feasting

Former Chef

Historical Cooking Project, The

History’s Just Desserts 

Hortus

Hungry Dog, The

In Search of Taste

Kitchen Historic

Life’s a Feast

Lost Past Remembered

Monsoon Spice

Parla Food

Pen & Palate

Plated Stories

Revolutionary Pie

This Cook Book Life

Thyme & Temp


---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose -- ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books) will earn a commission for this newsletter.

The Resource Guide for Food Writers 

The Herbalist in the Kitchen 

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries 

Human Cuisine 

Herbs: A Global History 

Terms of Vegery 

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating 

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #170 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication -- unless with the authors prior written permission -- is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2014 by Gary Allen.





The Libro-Emporium

Doorstops and lavatory entertainments abound in our book store.