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Food Sites for February 2018

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Unqualified Climactic Prognosticator: Marmota monax


The groundhog in the mugshot, above, spends his summers eye-balling (or worse) our garden. He’s sleeping soundly at the moment, no doubt dreaming of vegetarian feasts past and future. Very soon, one of his distant relatives will be dragged, protesting, into what we hope will be a darkly overcast Punxsatawney morning. The calendar may claim that Winter only lasts for three months, but it already feels like we’re a year or so into this one. 

We’ll just have to keep digging out—outside—and digging in, inside. We’ve completed the first and second drafts our new book (Après Escoffier: Sauces Reconsidered), and are still deep in the editing process—while making notes in our novel-in-progress. Basically, we’ve done little beside shoveling and scribbling. This self-aggrandising news, BTW, is our puny attempt at apologizing for the shortened issue this month.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection offer some lightly literary respite from winter.

The Highlanders regale themselves with whisky. They find it an excellent preservation against the winter cold. It is given with great success to the infants in the confluent smallpox. Tobias Smollett
I know the look of an apple that is roasting and sizzling on the hearth on a winter’s evening, and I know the comfort that comes of eating it hot, along with some sugar and a drench of cream... I know how the nuts taken in conjunction with winter apples, cider, and doughnuts, make old people’s tales and old jokes sound fresh and crisp and enchanting. Mark Twain
Gary
February, 2018

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out tasty sites (like Awanthi Vardaraj), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(“...an artist-led think tank that examines the biotechnologies and biodiversity of human food systems” that works together “with scientists, chefs, hackers and farmers“)

(Nadia Berenstein’s article, at Aeon, about Henry Theophilus Finck’s “programme for the mass-production of deliciousness”)

(Online international travel magazine’s offerings of food writing)

(Siddhartha Mitter’s essay, in Oxford American, on race, slime, and vegetal conflict)

(Zahra Hankir waxes nostalgic, and historical, on the roots of some classic Lebanese dishes)

(Dwight Furrow muses, philosophically and scientifically, on the ultimate nature of wine; at 3 Quarks Daily)

---- changed URL ----



---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----







---- yet more blogs ----








---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #208 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2018 by Gary Allen.



food sites for January 2018

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Looking neither back or ahead, but up.
The Dome of St. Peter’s, Rome.


Much is made, this time of year, about the two-faced Roman god, Janus, who looks both forward and backwards. The minor deity is an apt metaphor for the way we feel, passing through the door of new year. However, we’d rather pay homage to a different minor deity: Educa. She was responsible for young children’s nourishment... nourishment in two senses, since her name is etymologically connected to Latin words for “food” and “education.” Specifically, she helped infants make the transition from breast milk to adult food... and overcome their resistance to new and unusual foodstuffs. 

So the Romans understood that there is a connection between feeding the body and the mind. Fortunately (an etymological nod to another of the lesser Roman gods, Fortuna), we’re well-past the stage of resistance to strange foods. Bring ‘em on!

We’re frantically working on a new book (that’s due to be sent to the editor in a couple of months), so we re-purposed and updated an article, that was originally published by LeitesCulinaria, for Roll Magazine. A Jolly Olde Christmas features some wonderful recipes by Francine Segan, cookbook author extraordinaire.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quote (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection is something to think about... or maybe not.

Burgundy makes you think of silly things, Bordeaux makes you talk of them, and Champagne makes you do them. Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin
Gary
January, 2018

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we’ve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out tasty sites (like Cynthia Bertelsen and Nicola Miller), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if you’ve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or don’t wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. We’re happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and we’ll see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(huge database of citrus fruit varieties and cultivars, with photos and scientific details; from North Carolina State University and the University of California-Riverside)

(Emily Contois and Katherine Hysmith discuss food writing—academic and popular—in Graduate Association for Food Studies)

(online, often quirky, food magazine)

(Kelly Bone’s article at Serious Eats)

(Dan Nosowitz takes on fake foreign food names)

(Sam Knight’s Guardian article on the fastest—and fastest selling—food in England)

(“...masterpieces of the tabletop genre created by leading artists and designers worldwide;” in Ann Arbor, MI, but arranges exhibits in other places)

(Lesley Tellez’s article, in Taste, on the collection of Mexican cookbooks in the University of Texas at San Antonio Library’s Special Collections)

(Christine Jones, at Public Domain Review, on how the idea of chocolate—its culture and natural history—was introduced to the Old World)

(Veronique Greenwood cuts into the complicated stories about this complicated dessert for BBC Future)

(descriptions and photos of twenty relatively unfamiliar fruits)

(Benjamin Breen’s Res Obscura looks at the problem of identifying historical taste)

(Peter Schlagel and Ana Kinkaid serve up  “...the Best in Food, History, Hospitality and Culture”)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----





---- yet more blogs ----















---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #207 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2018 by Gary Allen.



Food Sites for December 2017

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Sturgeon fishing on the Hudson, part of a WPA mural Olin Dows painted for the Hyde Park Post office (1941).


We somehow managed to keep summer going a lot longer than usual this year... but, alas, it has finally come to an end. A couple of nights ago, we had our first killing frost. Basil, fresh from the garden—will only be only a memory until next year. Fortunately, the cold months have other flavors to delight us. As the holiday season continues, some of us will be sucking down caviar...  but the rest of us can try some alternatives. We posted a few at “Caviar, Friend or Faux?” in Roll Magazine.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection suggest the kind of moderation we tend to ignore during the holidays.

But some of us are beginning to pull well away, in our irritation, from... the exquisite tasters, the vintage snobs, the three-star Michelin gourmets. There is, we feel, a decent area somewhere between boiled carrots and Beluga caviar, sour plonk and Chateau Lafitte, where we can take care of our gullets and bellies without worshipping them.  J.B. Priestley 
Give me a platter of choice finnan haddie, freshly cooked in its bath of water and milk, add melted butter, a slice or two of hot toast, a pot of steaming Darjeeling tea, and you may tell the butler to dispense with the caviar, truffles and nightingales tongues. Craig Claiborne 
There is more simplicity in the man who eats caviar on impulse than in the man who eats grape-nuts on principle. G.K. Chesterton
Gary
December, 2017

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out tasty sites (like Dianne Jacob), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Henry Notaker’s survey in The Atlantic, drawing on his book, A History of Cookbooks: From Kitchen to Page Over Seven Centuries)

(Ligaya Mishan’s dark thoughts, in The New York Times)

(...and a lot of marketing)

(chemist Christopher Hendon explains some of the variables to control for The Conversation)

(Paul Chrystal, at the BBC’s History Extra, takes from the age of legend through the seventeenth century)

(an overview of Krishnendu Ray’s book, The Ethnic Restaurateur, in Appetite)

(Julia Belluz, at Vox, on how the chocolate industry intentionally steered research in the wrong direction)

(three New York Times pieces; by Jessica B. Harris, Bee Wilson, and Brenda Wineapple)

(a Wine Enthusiast introduction for budding helixophiles)

(“...online magazine that explores people’s lives through the food they cook and eat”)

(Li Anlan, in Shanghai Daily, describes some ingredients that are little-known in the West)

(an article plus infographic from Vinepair)

(from the archives of Iowa State University)

(Deborah White’s “...collection of indulgent American recipes from 1720 to 1980“)

(Emma Kay’s collection of “...objects and ephemera ...of the British kitchen...” late eighteenth century through the 1960s)

(Dwight and Lynn Furrow, at Edible Arts, on the relationship between unparsable complexity and perceived quality)

(explore food trends via Google News Lab and Truth & Beauty)

(Rachel Lauden reviews Sara Pennell‘s book, The Birth of the English Kitchen, 1600-1850)

(Bronwen and Francis Percival describe the differences between these two cheeses and—along the way—explain how the chemistry and process of cheese-making determine the character of the finished cheese; an article at Serious Eats)

(Farrell Monaco’s blogpost about a project using archaeology to recreate the foods ancient Romans ate at Pompeii)

(it’s much more than clarified butter; Aditya Raghavan and Sneha Shanker, writing in The Goya Journal)

(Paula Mejia, at Atlas Obscura, on Cornell University’s exhibit of Nach Waxman’s collection of early food memorabilia)

(Robin McKie—science editor at The Guardian—on what archaeology can tell us about ancient feasts)

(Ozoz Sokoh’s warmly nostalgic look at this west African cuisine; via Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----











---- yet more blogs ----






---- that‘s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #206 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2017 by Gary Allen.



Food Sites for November 2017

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Something from Rabelais, the Patron Saint of Holiday Excess.

The holiday season—or, as we like to call it, La Grande Bouffe—is about to descend upon us, appropriately enough, in the form of an all-devouring beast. There’s little we can do to stop this devastating assault on our carefully-composed diets, the resulting avoirdupois, or our gastrointestinal well-being... but, at least, none of the text of this newsletter has any caloric value.

Unless, of course, one is seduced by some of these websites  charms, in which case, all bets are off.

Oh well... there’s always January, the month of remorse.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection reflect some ambivalence about the centerpiece of a certain holiday.

TURKEY: This bird has various meanings depending on the action in your dream. If you saw one strutting and/or heard it gobbling, it portends a period of confusion due to instability of your friends or associates. However, if you ate it, you are likely to make a serious error in judgment.  Barbara Condrony 
TURKEY, n. A large bird whose flesh when eaten on certain religious anniversaries has the peculiar property of attesting piety and gratitude. Incidentally, it is pretty good eating.  Ambrose Bierce 
Turkey is undoubtedly one of the best gifts that the New World has made to the Old.  Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin 
Turkey takes so much time to chew. The only thing I ever give thanks for at Thanksgiving is that Ive swallowed it.  Sam Greene

Gary
November, 2017

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line.  It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those who have pointed out tasty sites (like Dianne Jacob), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(the Cotton MS Vitellius C III, in the collection of the British Library; text is in Old—which is to say, Anglo-Saxon—English, but includes a link to a modern English translation, available for purchase)

(Heather Arndt Anderson waxes nostalgic, at Taste, about a vegetable that has lost most of its former glamour)

(“Chinese recipes and eating culture”...with an emphasis on the foods of Sichuan and Shanxi)

(Pritha Sen, at LiveMint, on the source of hotness in Indian dishes, before the arrival of New World chiles)

(John Leavitt’s attempt to resolve—graphically—the endless arguments about what is, or is not, a sandwich)

(Via Dutton, at Literary Hub, savors a dessert of foie gras, sprinkled with ideas about food and guilt)

(downloadable resource compiled under the supervision of Dr. Allen J. Grieco)

(Fabio Parasecoli reviews Steffan Igor Ayora-Diaz’s Cooking Technology: Transformation in Culinary Practice in Mexico and Latin America, for Huffpost)

(archive of stories and podcasts from the Southern Foodways Alliance)

(Irakli Loladze has found a mathematical connection between rising atmospheric carbon dioxide and imbalance of micro-nutrients and carbohydrates in the world’s food supply)

(a map, from VinePair, that only hints at the complexity of the subject)

(Mackensie Griffin, at Eater, on how the eating habits of sleuths tell us who they are)

(the BBC’s Theodora Sutcliffe on a curious connection between history and charcuterie)

(Nora Ephron gushes, in The New Yorker, over the mechanical bliss of Krispy Kreme)

(a YouTube video from Japanology)

(high tech methods have made The Netherlands the capital of modern farming; article by Frank Viviano in National Geographic)

(Brian Handwerk, at the Smithsonian, on research into what makes some of us turn up our noses)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) sites for writers/bloggers ----




---- yet another blog ----



---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to help On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you plan to go shopping on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #205 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright ©2017 by Gary Allen.



The Libro-Emporium

Doorstops and lavatory entertainments abound in our book store.