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Food Sites for October 2016

Friday, September 16, 2016

A bin full of live frogs. Asian Supermarket, Colonie, NY.

We have fond memories of Frog Legs Provençal, the introduction to our first meal as a employee of The Culinary Institute of America, ages ago. 

Of course we’d eaten frog legs before, but they were not nearly as elegantly prepared or served. For example, sometime before, we had brought home a bag of live frogs to process into dinner. Our (then) girl friend walked in—saw the throbbing bag that was trying to hop off her kitchen table—and developed a sudden urge to become a vegan. 

We have other froggy memories, even less savory, such as time we stepped on half of a frog that had  been left for us—quite thoughtfully—by one of our cats.  We were, at the time, wearing our favorite pair of bare feet. The precise memory of cold, moist amphibian innards squeezing up between one’s toes does not fade with time, we might add.

Assuming that you’re pretty much sated with froggy memorabilia by now, we can move on to other news.

Roll Magazine published “Preserving Food, Preserving Culture,” an adaptation of parts of the introduction to Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Food, along with three recipes from the book. 
Aside to On the Table insiders: “Preserving Food, Preserving Culture” was my working title for the book. The publisher’s marketing team created the final title.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) returns—you’ll be thrilled to learn—to this month’s amphibian theme.

Three million frogs’ legs are served in Paris—daily. Nobody knows what became of the rest of the frogs. Fred Allen 
Waiter, there’s no fly in my soup! Kermit the Frog
Gary
October, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Rachel Laudan, who has been very busy lately), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(Smithsonian blogpost, by Jessica Carbone, about the evolution of sushi, mostly in California)

(Abby Reisner reviews Paul Freedman’s Ten Restaurants That Changed America, at Tasting Table)

(baked by Miguel Esquirol Rios, at The Historical Cooking Project)

(Sarah Yager, writing in The Atlantic, on the ubiquitous, hard, long-lasting, and relatively flavorless fruit)

(Paula Felps, at Live Happy, on recent experiments in neurogastronomy)

(an interview, at Civil Eats, with Emelyn Rude, author of Tastes Like Chicken)

(Mikhail Horowitz, on New York Jewish delicatessens, at Jewish Currents; or, as William Blake said, “The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom”)

(Rachel Laudan explains how the food of Hawaii enriched her understanding of food history, far beyond that of the islands)

(an early report on the state of agriculture in the Southeastern colonies)

(Tejal Rao, in The New York Times; forget fry bread and pemmican)

(Rachel Laudan looks at recent works that question our assumptions about the relationship between geography and cuisines)

(catalog of an exhibit, in the University of Michigan Library, on the history of beer in the US—from seventeenth-century home-brewers, through industrialization, prohibition, and back to home-brewing in the mid twentieth-century; coverage ends before the rise of craft brewing and brewpubs)

(a podcast on what we do, and don’t, know about the health effects of salt in the diet)

(Dwight Furrow, at Edible Arts, on the limitations of scientific language in writing abut wine)

(Dan Bergin-Holly waxes rhapsodic over breakfasts that tend to excess; at Extra Crispy)

(we may have receptors for more than five basic tastes, and one of the new ones might be for starch; report by Jessica Hamzelou in New Scientist)

(Nora Caplan-Bricker, in The New Yorker, on the performance art of Sonja Stummerer and Martin Hablesreiter, works that examine implicit eating rituals)

(Nova McCune Cadamatre considers the effect of global warming on the wines of the future, at Snooth; Spoiler alert: it doesn’t look like good news)

(experimental archaeologists used twelve-thousand-year-old methods and tools to process Israeli wild barley into bread; report published in PHYS.ORG)


---- changed URL ----



---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----







---- still more blogs ----



---- that‘s all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Occasionally, the URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation—other than the fact that they looked interesting to us.

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
These newsletters merely update the contents of the book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book.

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
 (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
(Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #192 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for September 2016

Wednesday, August 17, 2016
Beautiful Swimmers (Callinectes sapidus), crusted with Old Bay.

This may be the September issue, but it’s still August while we’re typing—and it’s bloody hot. It’s been bloody hot for ages. That means we long to wade into spicy salty foods (like steamed crabs) and hose ourselves down with icy IPA. Okay... maybe concentrate on getting most of that beer inside us (‘though a sanitizing beard shampoo wouldn’t be a terrible idea after a crabby encounter).

ANYWAY... there’s always someone who tells us that the reason spicy foods are preferred in hot climates is because it makes the natives perspire, which then cools them. Maybe that would work in the desert—where humidity doesn’t exist—but we’ve never noticed a sweat-shortage problem anywhere else. Eliminating excess moisture is more like it. 

We suspect that the cooling idea has as about much validity as the old saw about spices being used to cover the taste of spoiled meat. We scarf down spicy dishes for the same reason we swig frosty brews: We just like ‘em.

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quote (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) is meant to encourage us to write more (and well) about food—‘though a couple of blog posts in the “inspirational” section, below, warn us to watch our language.

Do not be afraid to talk about food. Food which is worth eating is worth discussing. And there is the occult power of words which somehow will develop its qualities. Marcel Boulestin

Gary
September, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Karla Simon), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.


---- the new sites ----

(recipes, ingredients, restaurants, from incredibly varied regional cuisines—including Afro-American and Afro-Caribbean foods)

(an Eater interview with Andrew Zimmern that addresses all things gastronomic—and anatomical)

(the story of “the Chile Capital of the World,” in New Mexico Magazine)

(Harold McGee begins one of his fascinating conversations at Lucky Peach)

(David Chang uses logic in an unexpected way to understand the intersection between flavor and memory)

(it’s not all about Jack)

(thousands of downloadable hi-res fruit images)

(Dwight Furrow, in Edible Arts, on how knowledge can inform perception in wine tasting)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----






---- still more blogs ----







---- thats all for now ----

Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Some of the URLs we provide may occasionally link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation (other than the fact that they looked interesting to us).

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
These newsletters merely update the contents of this book; 
what doesn’t appear here is already in the book.

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Terms of Vegery

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)


Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #191 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for Augaust 2016

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Oregano blossoms (Origanum vulgare)

With this issue, we begin our seventeenth year of publishing these monthly updates to The Resource Guide for Food Writers. What started as a way to keep one book up to date has become a place where hundreds of food lovers (amateurs, in the best sense), scholars, and professional scribblers have shared some of their favorite food-related links.

In other news: Roll Magazine has posted “Mayo on a Burger,” a culinary rant, simultaneously firing up the grill and self-righteous indignation,  and Modern Salt published a bit of anthropophagic levity: “What’s Eating You?”.

Finally, our latest book’s (Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods) is out. To support it, epicurious published an interview, “A Dry, Bitter, Salty History of Food Preservation”. By a strange coincidence, we were also interviewed by Atlas Obscura, for part of a larger article on sausages.

In related news: if you’re going to be near Kingston, New York on Thursday July 28th, there will be a reading and book-signing at the Barnes & Noble store on Ulster Avenue, at 7 PM. Stop by and say hello!

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter.  Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

This month’s quote (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) celebrates our most recent roadtrip (and, atypically, comes with a photo of its own):

In Baltimore, soft crabs are always fried (or broiled) in the altogether, with maybe a small jock-strap of bacon added. H.L. Mencken
Gary
August, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites we‘ve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Jonell Galloway), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.

---- the new sites ----

(Urvija Banerji, at Atlas Obscura, on the quintessential South Asian rice dish)

(Meredith Goad, in The Portland Press Herald, on recent work by Certified Master Taster Michael Kalanty)

(e-zine on the influence of British foodways on American cookery, replete with historical articles and recipes)

(digitized books in the Research Library Department of Special Collections of UCLA’s Bancroft Library)

(Jan Whitaker, on how and when restaurant kitchens switched from coal to gas)

(international food, via recipes, blog, stories, cookbook reviews)

(Carolyn Beans, at NPR’s The Salt, on recent research into the biological reasons for similar wine’s differing flavors)

(is anyone more qualified to write about diners than Michael Stern?—an epicurious article)

(Cynthia Bertelsen, in Modern Salt, argues against popular—and probably overly-simplistic—notions about the origins of cooking in the American South)

(Dorothy Willette, at the Biblical Archaeology Society’s site, on the function of meals in Ancient Israel)

(“dedicated to those who are not ashamed of economy”—online text of Lydia Maria Francis Child’s 1830 book; at Feeding America’s archive)

(Lauren Young, at Atlas Obscura, on how the most rudimentary food prep has altered our evolution)

(Robert Moss, on the history of soft drinks, at Serious Eats)

(Donna Battle Pierce, decries Whole Foods “discovery” of the southern staple, in Ebony)

(Wes Berry, at the Southern Foodways Alliance, on the complicated flavors of Bluegrass BBQ)

(a Rachel Lauden multicultural adventure in etymology)

(an excerpt from Joel Denker’s The Carrot Purple and Other Curious Stories of the Food We Eat)

(The Atlantic’s Megan Garber faces breakfast)

(Brenna Houck slathers a geography of sauces at Eater)

(Gary Gillman, at Beer et seq., on the ethnic origins of—and techniques used to produce—moonshine)

(provided by Kenneth J. Carpenter, in The Journal of Nutrition;
Part 2, 1885–1912 ; Part 3, 1912–1944Part 4, 1945–1985)

(Chris Buckley, in The New York Times, on fears about the survival of traditional fare)

(Ruchira Paul examines the nature of scent at 3 Quarks Daily)

(Scienmag article on recent discoveries, in China, by archaeologist Gary Crawford)

(Emily Bell, at VinePair, on a yeast genus that is becoming popular among brewers, and drinkers, who want to bring on the funk—and sourness—in their beers)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----














---- still more blogs ----




---- thats all for now ----


Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Some of the URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation (other than the fact that they looked interesting to us).

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it?

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to your cost (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
(these newsletters merely update the contents of this book; what doesn’t appear here is already in the book)

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)
  (Kindle)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #190 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the author‘s prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.


Food Sites for July 2016

Wednesday, June 15, 2016


Great Spangled Frittillary (Speyeria cybele) on Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa). It must be summer!

Since our last issue, we’ve been hiking and photographing (not to mention eating) our way across New York’s Adirondacks and Finger Lakes regions—and yet, we’ve found time to put together a summer issue of these updates.

In other news: Roll Magazine has posted “St. Even’s Challenge,” a culinary adventure story. Modern Salt has published another gastronomic saga: “Fat Lady Burrito,” one with a moral of sorts (or at least what passes for a moral around here). 

Inscrutably, our latest book’s (Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods) release date has been changed to July fifteenth. Perhaps the powers that be are waiting for the book to complete its fermentation (either that, or US Customs noticed a strange smell coming from the shipment of books from England). We have received our authors copies, so we know they exist...

You can, if you wish, follow us on Facebook, and Twitter. Still more of our online scribbles can be found at A Quiet Little Table in the Corner.

“Sumer is icummin in” and this month’s quotes (from On the Table’s culinary quote collection) can “sing cuccu” with the best of em:

The nectarine and curious peach Into my hands themselves do reach; Stumbling on melons, as I pass, Ensnared with flowers, I fall on grass. Andrew Marvell 
Around here, grillin’s grillin’ and barbecue is, well—sigh, sweat’what dinin’ in heaven's got to be all about. Jane Garvey 
When one has tasted watermelon he knows what the angels eat. Mark Twain
Gary
July, 2016

PS: If you encounter broken links, changed URLs—or know of wonderful sites weve missed—please drop us a line. It helps to keep this resource as useful as possible for all of us. To those of you who have introduced us to sites like the ones in this newsletter (such as Fabio Parasecoli), thanks, and keep them coming!

PPS: If you wish to change the e-mail address at which you receive these newsletters, or otherwise modify the way you receive our postings or—if youve received this newsletter by mistake, and/or dont wish to receive future issues—you have our sincere apology and can have your e-mail address deleted from the list immediately. Were happy (and continuously amazed) that so few people have decided to leave the list but, should you choose to be one of them, let us know and well see that your in-box is never afflicted by these updates again. You’ll find links at the bottom of this page to fix everything to your liking.

---- the new sites ----

(Zev Robinson’s exhibit of paintings, food, film, and wine at the London Cooking Project)

(Dean Burnett, in The Guardian, on why the various parts of our bodies can’t seem to agree)

(Paula Mourenza, at Culinary Backstreets, on the ritual, historical, and botanical aspects of Ilex paraguariensis)

(John Metcalfe, in The Atlantic, on a banquet of foods with a message, served in Gembloux, Belgium)

(how Western plant foods became Chinese mainstays; a contribution from The Cleaver Quarterly’s to Lucky Peach)

(Chris Ying’s “global look at the tube steak”—via Lucky Peach)

(Andrea Nguyen dishes on the quintessential Vietnamese rice-noodle soup, at Lucky Peach)

(Nigerian chef Tunde Wey, thinking about race and assumptions in the food industry and elsewhere; article in the Boston Globe)

(Jonathan Morris’s paper addressing the “...material history of espresso that can be read alongside that of the socio-cultural conditions that have occasioned its success”)

(Stanley Dry stirs the pot at Southern Foodways Alliance)

(Chris Fuhrmeister, at Eater, waves a red flag in front of a lot of Texas longhorns)

(Ria Misra, at Gizmodo, on new research from the famous Monell Chemical Senses Center)

(Erin McCarthy seeks an answer at Mental Floss)


---- inspirational (or otherwise useful) site for writers/bloggers ----






---- still more blogs ----







---- thats all for now ----


Except, of course, for the usual legalistic mumbo-jumbo and commercial flim-flam:

Some of the URLs we provide may link to commercial sites (that is, they’ll cost you money to take full advantage of them). We do not receive any compensation for listing them here, and provide them without any form of recommendation (other than the fact that they looked interesting to us).

Your privacy is important to us. We will not give, sell or share your e-mail address with anyone, for any purpose—ever. Nonetheless, we will expose you to the following irredeemably brazen plugs: 

Want to support On the Table, without spending a dime of your own money on it? 

It’s easy. Whenever you want to shop on Amazon. Com, click on any of the book links below, then whatever you buy there will earn a commission for this newsletter without adding to the cost of whatever you purchase there (it doesn’t even have to be one of our books).

The Resource Guide for Food Writers
(Paper)
(Kindle)
[these newsletters merely update the contents of this book; 
what doesn’t appear here is already in the book]

The Herbalist in the Kitchen
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

The Business of Food: Encyclopedia of the Food And Drink Industries
(Hardcover)

Human Cuisine
(Paper)
 (Kindle)

Herbs: A Global History
(Hardcover)
(Kindle)

Sausage: A Global History
(Hardcover)

Can It! The Perils and Pleasures of Preserving Foods
(Hardcover)

Terms of Vegery
(Kindle)

How to Serve Man: On Cannibalism, Sex, Sacrifice, & the Nature of Eating
(Kindle)

Here endeth the sales pitch(es)...

...for the moment, anyway.

______________

The Resource Guide for Food Writers, Update #189 is protected by copyright, and is provided at no cost, for your personal use only. It may not be copied or retransmitted unless this notice remains affixed. Any other form of republication—unless with the authors prior written permission—is strictly prohibited.

Copyright (c) 2016 by Gary Allen.


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